Different types of goal [football]

Dear friends!

In Russian we have a lot of idiomatic phrases used to talk about different types of goal scored in footbal. Most of these words are slangish but not indecent and therefore are frequently used in newspapers and on TV. The words themselves do not tell us anything about how the goal has been scored, as a result of header or a penaly, for example. The words are referred to the time when goals have been scored.

1) The goal scored very quickly after the beginning of the match, or, to put it more strictly, scored in the first 20 minutes:

Quick/fast/swift/prompt/brisk goal


2) The goal scored before the break (after playing 45 minutes and some extra time) so that the team that has miised the goal usually gets bewildered and complexed because they did not anticipate that they would miss the goal just before the referee's whistle

"Goal in the changing room"
(because players stay in the changing room during the break to change their uniform/clothing and discuss with their coach what they are going to do in the second half)

3) The goal which made the score in favour of a team and the score did not change after that. So that goal proved to be crucial (decisive) and brought the overall victory for one of the teams

"Victory goal"

Thanks
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    1) would probably be called an early goal
    2) I don't know of a specific idiom (for the goal scored after the team gets a good "talking to" from the coach at half-time)
    3) Both "winning goal" (provides the 1 goal margin of the eventual victory) and "go-ahead" goal (provides the goal which puts the team in the lead but not necessarily the final goal - e.g. the second goal in a 3-1 victory where the other teams cored first) come to mind.
     
    1) would probably be called an early goal
    2) I don't know of a specific idiom (for the goal scored after the team gets a good "talking to" from the coach at half-time)
    3) Both "winning goal" (provides the 1 goal margin of the eventual victory) and "go-ahead" goal (provides the goal which puts the team in the lead but not necessarily the final goal - e.g. the second goal in a 3-1 victory where the other teams cored first) come to mind.
    Thanks, Julian!

    Your suggestion about an early goal sounds reasonable and logical and sometimes it is said the same way in Russian but still quite rarely. In my language "quick/swift goal" is preferred, but it does not matter because here we are discussing English.

    As regards my question 2, I think the answer is not quite what I was speaking about. Usually after having a "talking to" with a coach a team starts playing better in the second half and is more likely to score than to miss again. Do you remember some 10 years ago when Beckham was a player of Manchester United sir Alex Fergusson threw boots at him because he had failed to do what his coach had been expecting him to do :). It happened in the changing room and I suppose no one wanted to be attacked the same way at the end of the game and the goalkeeper did not want to miss the goal :). I digressed here to show that the goal I was speaking about normally happens before the break and sometimes even in the extra time. Thus I think "goal-to-the-changing-room" is closest. Probably in English it is said another way because the option offered is that literally translated from Russian and in my language it is acceptable and very widely used in press and on TV.

    Some more clarifications are required in reply #3. Does "winning goal" mean that a team necessarily wins 1:0? For example, last weekend Berbatov scored in the 83rd minute to Liverpool on the Old Trafford and brought the victory to MU 3:2. Was Berbatov's goal a winning goal? I think I have grasped the meaning of "go-ahead" goal because it is very clear. Berbatov's goal was first a "go-ahead" goal because, to tell the truth, I suspected Liverpool would score again and equalize, which did not happen as we know now. So the striker's goal proved to be "winning goal" only after a referee's whistle.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    One more question: Sometimes a goal can be scored very unusually. Imagine, say, a striker hits the ball, it gets into another player, than one more player and after hitting the crossbar crosses a goal's line so that a goalkeeper is powerless. Remember the goal by Fabregas to Sunderland on weekend when a defender wanted to send the ball forward to start an attack and it suddenly changed direction hitting Fabregas's leg and after that traveled right behind the goalkeeper's back. Everything happened almost instantaneously and even the triumpher himself, who had already been receiving greeting, had not yet realized what had happened. What do you call such goals: "mad/crazy/stray/windfall" goals?

    Best

    P.S. By the way it might have been the word "changing room" that you made you confused about my second question. Maybe the word is incorrect. Changing rooms are in shops and are used to change clothes and try new ones. I am not sure the same word is used for the place where footballers spend the break between two halfs and where they also discuss what was going on in the firs half with their coach
     
    Last edited:
    1) I agree with Julian - it's an early goal.

    2) It's a 'late first half' goal or 'a first half added time' goal.

    3) We have no particular phrase for that.

    --------------

    It's a freak goal.

    Rover
    Thanks, Rover! Nice to hear from you again!

    Tell me please even if "early goal" is the only idiom possible which word is the closest substitute "fast/quick/prompt/swift/brisk"?

    I am still in doubt about #3. Why do you disapprove of "winning goal" or "go-ahead goal"?

    #2: Can be shorten it? 'late first half' goal or 'a first half added time' goal is more similar to a newspaper word. What about chatting with friends, drinking beer (I do not drink!) and abusing a goalkeeper who had forgotten what for he had been taken in a team :) Will you say, for example, "Van der Saar missed a first half added time goal"?

    Best
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I'm very surprised by Rover's comment on "winning goal".
    This particular expression is used all the time.
    I've never heard of a "go-ahead goal".
     
    I'm very surprised by Rover's comment on "winning goal".
    This particular expression is used all the time.
    I've never heard of a "go-ahead goal".
    I am surprised, too. Probably Rover dislikes it for some reason which has not yet told us. As regards "g0-ahead", I cannot comment on it because thought the meaning is evident, I do not know if the word is idiomatic or not. The only thing we can do to elucidate this matter is wait till Julian turns up and ask him to explain and say where he has heard this phrase before.
     
    (1) Early goal; goal in the opening minutes.
    (2) No idea.
    (3) Winning goal; deciding goal(?).
    Thanks! #1 is beyond doubt now and it is easiest to think of. #2 is probably difficult, I know. Hardly any Russian, by the way, will manage to think of an equivalent Russian word unless they know anything about football. I like "deciding goal". I think "decisive goal" will be OK as well because "deciding" and "decisive" are synonymous as far as I have understood. Probably "determinative" and "determinant" will work too, but I have some doubt about the latter word ("determinant") because it looks more like a mathematical term.

    Best
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I'd say determinative and determinant are far too high in register for football: fans would work them out from the context but would undoubtedly think, "Why's he using such fancy words?"
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    For (3), I agree with ewie about determinative and determinant :)eek:); I don't think decisive goal would work either. Alongside deciding goal, I'm pretty sure I've heard decider.



    Big football fan, me.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm pretty sure I've heard it too.

    But I've also heard it to mean the decisive, usually the last, race in a series of races in other sports, e.g. F1. The championship decider.
    Yes - I've found this dictionary definition:
    decider

    (deciders plural )
    1 n-count In sport, a decider is one of the games in a series, which establishes which player or team wins the series.
    (BRIT, JOURNALISM)
    He won the decider which completed England's 3-2 victory over Austria.

    2 n-count In games such as football and hockey, the decider is the last goal to be scored in a match that is won by a difference of only one goal.
    (BRIT, JOURNALISM)
    McGrath scored the decider in Villa's 2-1 home win over Forest.
    Source
     
    I am surprised, too. Probably Rover dislikes it for some reason which has not yet told us.
    I demurred about winning goal because at one point you specified that you were talking about a goal that put one team in the lead with time remaining for the opposition to score again (you called it a 'go-ahead goal', which we don't).

    Of course it's a winning goal when we know the result of the match.

    Rover
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    One more question: Sometimes a goal can be scored very unusually. Imagine, say, a striker hits the ball, it gets into another player, than one more player and after hitting the crossbar crosses a goal's line so that a goalkeeper is powerless. Remember the goal by Fabregas to Sunderland on weekend when a defender wanted to send the ball forward to start an attack and it suddenly changed direction hitting Fabregas's leg and after that traveled right behind the goalkeeper's back. Everything happened almost instantaneously and even the triumpher himself, who had already been receiving greeting, had not yet realized what had happened. What do you call such goals: "mad/crazy/stray/windfall" goals?

    Best
    I suppose I would just say a "goal off/from/after a ricochet" or maybe even a "goal after a few ricochets" if there were more players involved. If the ball hits the crossbar and crosses the line, I think you could say it's a "goal off the crossbar", you could also say that the ball ricocheted off the crossbar and went into the net/went off the crossbar and into the net, etc. I can't think of one specific expression to describe everything you wanted.

    P.S. By the way it might have been the word "changing room" that you made you confused about my second question. Maybe the word is incorrect. Changing rooms are in shops and are used to change clothes and try new ones. I am not sure the same word is used for the place where footballers spend the break between two halfs and where they also discuss what was going on in the firs half with their coach
    I'm sure I've heard the term "dressing room" in this context.
     
    Thanks for your contributions!

    I would like to repeat my question from post #5: tell me please even if "early goal" is the only idiom possible which word is the closest substitute "fast/quick/prompt/swift/brisk" or any other substitute related to the amount of time passed from the beginning of a game till the minute when the goal was scored?

    Thanks!
     

    kitenok

    Senior Member
    "Quick goal" could easily be used to describe an "early goal" in American English (see this description of Gerrard's goal in the 4th minute of the US-England game for example).

    But it would also be used describe goals that are "quick" relative to things other than the start of the game. For example: "Dmitry scored for Russia in the 44th minute, but ewie came back and scored a quick goal for England before the end of the half." "Quick" here, of course, means "quickly after Dmitry's goal."
     
    "Quick goal" could easily be used to describe an "early goal" in American English (see this description of Gerrard's goal in the 4th minute of the US-England game for example).

    But it would also be used describe goals that are "quick" relative to things other than the start of the game. For example: "Dmitry scored for Russia in the 44th minute, but ewie came back and scored a quick goal for England before the end of the half." "Quick" here, of course, means "quickly after Dmitry's goal."
    Thanks, kitenok! I have taken a look at your link and seen that very phrase "quick goal". I thought there should be some word (quick or another one) to describe goals scored very soon after the beginning of a game.

    Best
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Ah yes, but, Kitenok, you'll notice he says:
    by scoring a quick goal in just the third minute of the
    so (effectively) explaining that he doesn't mean 'a goal that only took 2 nanoseconds' but, as he goes on:
    an early goal is always far less dangerous than a late one
    Early goal requires no explanation; quick goal could be just, well, any goal scored quickly, say when one of the chappies in the middle of the field kicks the ball and it goes straight in the other chappies' net (no idea if this actually ever happens): that would be a quick goal.

    (I can't believe I'm doing this. I'd rather have my eyes removed with cocktail sticks than watch a football game.)
     

    kitenok

    Senior Member
    Early goal requires no explanation; quick goal could be just, well, any goal scored quickly
    I agree completely, and I even tried to agree preemptively by giving examples of other meanings in my earlier post. But I do think that my first assumption, with no further context, on seeing the headline "Ewie Scores Quick Goal in Very Important English Football Match," would be that he scored the goal early in the game, not that the play on which he scored took a short amount of time.

    Here is another example of a US blogger describing Gerrard's early goal as a quick goal (source):
    The hardest blow, though, was when Gerrard scored the quick goal against us.
    He does not specify when the goal was scored, but I think he assumes his audience (the dozen or so football soccer fans in the US) already knows this.

    Well, and here's Steven Gerrard himself talking about a goal that was scored in the seventh minute against Everton, though he himself doesn't mention that it was scored in the seventh minute (just veguely associates it with a "quick start") (source):

    "You're always after a quick start in the derby and a quick goal and we got that, and in the first half we completely dominated the game. We maybe deserved a bigger margin of victory.
     

    mathman

    Senior Member
    English-American/New England
    1) would probably be called an early goal
    2) I don't know of a specific idiom (for the goal scored after the team gets a good "talking to" from the coach at half-time)
    3) Both "winning goal" (provides the 1 goal margin of the eventual victory) and "go-ahead" goal (provides the goal which puts the team in the lead but not necessarily the final goal - e.g. the second goal in a 3-1 victory where the other teams cored first) come to mind.
    I agree with these comments on "go-ahead" goal. In AE, we refer to the "go-ahead run" in baseball in the same context. "Winning goal" is also referred to as the "game-winner."
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    "Winning goal" is also referred to as the "game-winner."
    I'm pretty certain I've heard the term match-winner in BE:
    Kitenok's goal in what felt like the 289th minute was the match-winner.

    (I'm now unsubscribing from this thread, having had enough football to last me 13 lifetimes.)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I agree with these comments on "go-ahead" goal. In AE, we refer to the "go-ahead run" in baseball in the same context. "Winning goal" is also referred to as the "game-winner."
    I have been visiting the outernet with no links to the Internet!
    Winning goal, game winner and decider are all the same thing and take the score from a tie(draw) to a one goal lead that becomes the final score.
    In the US the "go-ahead" concept refers to the score that breaks the tie but is not the final score by the winning team. If the margin is more than one goal, I never figured out which is considered the winning goal or decider :(
     

    mathman

    Senior Member
    English-American/New England
    I have been visiting the outernet with no links to the Internet!
    Winning goal, game winner and decider are all the same thing and take the score from a tie(draw) to a one goal lead that becomes the final score.
    In the US the "go-ahead" concept refers to the score that breaks the tie but is not the final score by the winning team. If the margin is more than one goal, I never figured out which is considered the winning goal or decider :(
    In college soccer, they keep track of "game-winning goals" or "game winners" for each player on the team. This is the goal the player scored that breaks a tie for the last time. So if the final score is 10-4, it is the goal that made the score 5-4.
     
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