Dig in the Dancing Queen

Steno1

Senior Member
Italian
Hi there,

What does " dig in " mean in that famous Abba's song ?

"See that girl, watch that scene, dig in the dancing queen"
 
  • TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Howdy

    Apparently it means absolutely nothing.
    Abba chose it because they liked the sound.
    There is one theory that says it's a translation from a Swedish phrase,
    but no details were posted.

    It makes no sense to me...
     

    aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhh

    New Member
    English- Ireland
    Well, in American slang, especially Afro-American slang from the seventies, to dig meant to like, understand or appreciate something- 'I really did her hair' it may mean this.


    Ya dig?
     

    fidobsa

    New Member
    English - Scotland
    Yes, I wondered about that song myself. Perhaps there as a brand of fertiliser in Sweden called "Dancing Queen", as in "Dig in some well rotted Dancing Qeeen" ;) I've also wondered about the Fleetwood Mac words: "She won't shake her money maker" My theory is that this is also a horticulture reference i.e. the lady in question refuses to artificially pollinate her tomato plants.
     

    redhairedgirl

    Senior Member
    italiano
    Ciao a tutti!
    Volevo riaprire il thread (spero che sia giusto, admin!) - ma per chiedervi di "Dancing Queen".
    In un sottotitolo ho
    BUS STOP DANCING QUEEN e si vede una signora che, credendo di non essere vista, balla alla fermata dell'autobus.
    "Regina del ballo/della festa" è un discreto calco e si riferisce ad un contesto preciso: diva, principessa non mi convincono, andrei più per un "Genio del ballo", "Super ballerina" - qualche idea?

    Grazie!
    RHG
     

    sorry66

    Senior Member
    English, England
    Ciao RHG,
    'Dancing Queen' - le due parole insieme qui sono talmente conosciuto (grazie alla canzone di Abba) allora devi trovare una espressione conosciuta!
     

    redhairedgirl

    Senior Member
    italiano
    Ciao, Bic
    non so, ho cercato regina danzante, ma non mi convince tanto, perché si perde il riferimento agli ABBA (giustamente mantenuto nel video, perché c'è la canzone in sottofondo!); per tradurlo, però, vorrei anche mantenere il significato (cito Wikipedia) «"regina della festa", intesa come una festa da ballo, cioè la ragazza più bella che si fa notare per la sua avvenenza». Stravolgendo, mi verrebbe "diva del sabato sera".
     

    bicontinental

    Senior Member
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    Ciao di nuovo, RHG

    Pensavo che 'Regina Danzante' fosse la traduzione 'ufficiale' della canzone siccome e’ il titolo usato in ogni traduzione italiana che ho trovato su internet, ma forse si tratta di un errore copiato ripetutamente.;)

    Sono d’accordo che ‘regina della festa’ funzionerebbe bene nel contesto della canzone... anche ‘diva del sabato sera’, pero’ secondo me il titolo inglese Dancing Queen... in se... non ha questo significato sottinteso (di venerdì sera ecc.)

    Quindi, mi chiedo se invece sara’ più semplice usare il titolo originale in inglese, Dancing Queen. Non so quant'era conosciuta questa canzone all'epoca in Italia, ma immagino che il titolo inglese sia un riferimento istantaneo agli ABBA ...almeno per la gente che e’ cresciuta con la loro musica!

    Bic.
     
    Last edited:

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The dialogues in the Mamma Mia! film are dubbed into Italian, Bic, but the songs are left in English. Abba have always always been popular here, by the way. I think what you found on the Internet was just a translation of the lyrics, a common enough phenomenon as not everyone understands English. A pretty standard request: I'm often asked to translate bits of songs for people.:)
     

    bicontinental

    Senior Member
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    Ah, interesting LC:) Since the songs are left in English in the Mamma Mia movie, it might be the best option to keep the English song title...
     

    redhairedgirl

    Senior Member
    italiano
    Ciao a tutti, scusate il ritardo:
    I agree with bicontinental; not only I'm a big ABBA fan, but the reference is so clear that I think I can just leave "Dancing Queen" in English. Moreover, the movie is aimed at young people (is this "aimed at" correct?) so there's definitely no need of domestication.
    GRAZIE!
    RHG
     

    redhairedgirl

    Senior Member
    italiano
    Ops! Domestication is a term we usually refer to in translation theory: it is a strategy we use to "domesticate" a term otherwise completely obscure in the target language. One chooses to use a term closer to the culture of the target language (sometimes agreeing upon losing part of its original meaning or external references): "Regina della festa" would have been the "domesticated" version of "Dancing Queen". :)
    (I hope my English is understandable, looks like I can't write properly, today)
     

    OrioMenoni

    New Member
    Italian
    My interpretation:
    "Watch the scene dig in the dancing queen"
    means
    "Look at the crowd as it gathers around the dancing queen"
    Where dig in is a metaphor for the admirers "burying" the beautiful girl by circling her in.
     

    Braeden

    New Member
    English
    It's friday night. Look for a place to go. Get in the swing. Look for a king. Dont worry you can still dance. You can have a time of your life. You are not old. You can be seventeen again. DIG IN THE DANCING QUEEN.

    -Rediscover the child in you.
    -Have fun again.
    -Do something childish
    -Dance
    -Remember who you were before the world told you who you should be.
    -Relive the child in you.
    -Dig in the dancing queen
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I'm probably mistaken, but in the song is an allusion to a dancing gay/transvestite really impossible? I'm thinking of the expression ''drag queen'', and I know that ''queen'' can be slang for a gay man (''a fag''). Effeminate men often call themselves a girl, a queen. Or is this all too far-fetched?
     

    bicontinental

    Senior Member
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    I've always hated Abba.:D
    Awww, really! What was it...the platform boots or the spandex? ;):D I loved ABBA, memorized the lyrics to all their songs.:D

    Some really interesting interpretations above, but I agree with others that you probably don't have to search high and low for a deeper meaning here. I was 10 when ABBA gained popularity and their audience seemed to include mostly children, teens and young adults so when they sing about a 16 year old dancing queen, I think that's exactly what they mean, they are addressing their audience (pointing at some girl in the crowd on videos), not an older woman who longs for her lost youth, not gays, drag queens or transvestites, just one of their many young fans...at least that's my interpretation.
     
    Last edited:

    Pietruzzo

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Actually the song is more about sex than dancing. The girl goes to the disco and acts on the dance floor in a way that makes it clear she's looking for guys. So to me those infamous lines sound like someone's comment about that scene:
    Guardate quella ragazza
    Guardate che scena
    Trattenete la "regina del ballo"
    (ma non ci riuscirete)
    Anyway most of Italians (and I for one) listen to the songs in English without understanding the lyrics. A volte è meglio:D
     
    Last edited:

    funkysax

    New Member
    German
    Hi guys, some time has passed and yet here is another idea on this gamechanging:D topic:
    Someone of ABBA might have listened to Bunny Clarke's "Be Thankful" which had been released in the previous year (1975) and mixed it up a little (Diggin' the dancing Queen instead of the scene):

    Diamond in the back, sunroof top
    Diggin' the scene
    With a gangsta lean
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top