Dig in Vs Tuck in?

  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    As usual, sambistapt, you are parsimonious with context and background. That doesn't help at all.

    Who is the speaker? What variety of English does that person use?
    Who is being spoken to?
    What are the circumstances?
     

    sambistapt

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Sorry :eek:

    Here you are:

    We were starving so we really DUG IN when the food finally did arrive.
    The dinner smelled so good I couldn't wait to TUCK IN.

    I hope it helps,

    Sam:cool:
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    These are old-fashioned expressions (which does not mean that they are not often used). But I couldn't say which is more common.

    By the way, if you are the host and want people to start eating, you would not say "please dig in," or "please tuck in" (if you are a refined person like me, that is!). Say instead "enjoy your meal" or "please help yourself".
     

    fauxdefafa

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "tuck in" is rarely used, at least in my experience. "Dig in," on the other hand, is a commonly used informal phrase. You wouldn't pair it with "please," but if you were with friends, or immediate family, there is no reason not for the host to say, "dig in!"

    Like e2efour said, in a formal setting, "please help yourself" is the polite form to say "start eating now."
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't use or hear "Dig in!" or "Tuck in!" in the sense of "Start eating." Nor would I present someone with a plate of food and say, "Please help yourself", because that to me means "Please serve yourself", which does not fit the situation.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Dig in" is a common AE expression in the context of starting eating. I had never heard of the expression "tuck in" with respect to food until it appeared a few days ago in this forum (although I did know the Australian expression "tucker.")

    I normally associate "tuck in" with putting infants to bed.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Nor would I present someone with a plate of food and say, "Please help yourself", because that to me means "Please serve yourself", which does not fit the situation.
    Quite right! I should have written "please help yourselves" (I am assuming that people are not served with the vegetables and have to help themselves!). An alternative phrase is "Bon appetit" or "Please start".
     

    Lance Baker

    New Member
    American English
    This is mostly a U.S. vs British choice. British usually say "Tuck in". It's like "Good Job" (U.S.) vs "Well done" (British). Aside: Folks here in North Carolina ALWAYS greet you in late December with "Merry Christmas", even if they have never met you. Folks west of the Mississippi usually say "Happy hollidays", since a fair proportion of who we meet are not Christian, so let's be inclusive.
     

    Lance Baker

    New Member
    American English
    "Dig in" is a common AE expression in the context of starting eating. I had never heard of the expression "tuck in" with respect to food until it appeared a few days ago in this forum (although I did know the Australian expression "tucker.")

    I normally associate "tuck in" with putting infants to bed.
    Try any episode of "Jamie's Quick & Easy Food". That's where I hear i"Tuck in" without excepion every episode. He is also a fan of "Whack it in the oven".
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I never hear "tuck in" in the U.S. On the other hand, I've heard "dig in" my whole life. It's often used in informal settings.
     
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