dignity in dying / dying with dignity

blwings

Senior Member
Korean-S.Korea
Dignity in Dying is a United Kingdom nationwide campaigning organisation.
I wonder how differently the organisation's name is sounded to native English speakers from the expression, 'dying with dignity'.
I guess the basic meaning is the same but I want to know a subtle distinction between these, if there's any.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The two are quite distinct, and not at all the same:

    Dignity in Dying - the nuance of this is that the slogan/name requests that there be significant component of dignity that is supplied to the patient by the medical/caring staff and is present during the course of dying.

    Dying with dignity - the nuance of this is that your personal dignity (as an individual characteristic, i.e. that which is within you) is maintained until death. This would make a poor slogan/name, as not everyone possesses a significant amount of dignity.
     

    abluter

    Senior Member
    British English
    I cannot quite appreciate the fine difference that PaulQ discerns between the two phrases. I can see nothing in "Dignity in Dying" which implies that the dignity is necessarily supplied by someone other than the dying person, (though of course it may be in many cases).

    "He showed great dignity in dying".
    "He died with great dignity".
    These seem to mean the same thing exactly.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I cannot quite appreciate the fine difference that PaulQ discerns

    It is possible to die in pain in your own excreta and disregarded and maltreated by those about you. There is little dignity in (within) this, although, internally, you may attempt to maintain an aura of being dignified. In this case, you still do not die in dignity, although you may die with (in possession of) dignity.
     

    abluter

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thank you; so the difference lies in the distinction between "in" and "with". I would entirely agree with your whole post#5 except for the word "dignity" in the second sentence, which I would replace with "decorum", but I see the point you are making.
     
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