dim v. dusky v. gloomy

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hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
1. "The eyes of sharks are very sensitive to light. They are made of seeing things under the water, where light can be very dim."

Which of the following can be used instead of "where light can be very dim", retaining the meaning?

2 "The eyes of sharks are very sensitive to light. They are made of seeing things under the water, where light can be very dusky."

3. "The eyes of sharks are very sensitive to light. They are made of seeing things under the water, where light can be very gloomy."

Source:
Zoobooks Sharks

dim - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
dusky - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
gloomy - WordReference.com Dictionary of English

Thank you.


 
  • DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Neither (2) nor (3) works there. :(

    A room or a place can be dusky or gloomy, but light itself is normally dim or bright.

    If you need to paraphrase sentence (1), then "... where there isn't much light" would probably work.

    [edited to correct typo]
     
    Last edited:

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    Dim is definitely the best.
    I'd say dusky was used mainly in the phrase a dusky maiden - a girl who is attractive because of her dark features. I wouldn't use dusky or gloomy to refer to light.
    A gloomy castle is one where there isn't much light. A gloomy outlook on life is a pessimistic outlook on life.
    Cross-posted.
    I think DonnyB means bright.
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    Gloom/gloomy can suggest an eerie atmosphere. I glimpsed a shadowy figure in the gloom. I felt uneasy in the gloom of the castle.
     
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