dink [DINK/DINKY: acronym]

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

I wonder if it is acceptable and valid when someone interpret the word "dink" as "double income, no kids"?

Because I couldn't look it up here, I am doubting its popularity.

Can I say:

They created a dink family last year.
Thanks a lot
 
  • shawnee

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    Interesting. Yes, 'dink' is a known term for what you say. As for running it in the sentence provided I'm not sure. Perhaps if it was put as, 'They constituted a dink family' it might be better. The sentence would have to be put in such a context so as the reader will get the point, without relying entirely on knowledge of the acronym.
     
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    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Perhaps if it was put as, 'They constituted a dink family' it might be better. The sentence would have to be put in such a context so as the reader will get the point, without relying entirely on knowledge of the acronym.
    Well, I got it. So, according to your latter part of your comment, can I understand that I must explain or express the idea "dink family" then others can grasp my meaning?

    Thanks a lot
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I've seen it capitalized, since acronyms are usually capitalized in English: DINK. Never saw it in all lower case letters before this thread.

    Even if someone doesn't know what it means, having it in upper-case letters is a signal that it's an acronym, not a word that the reader doesn't know.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    So I should write the sentence like this:

    They constituted a DINK family a few last year.

    Is it right?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    As far as I can recall, I've only come across this as DINKY (Dual Income No Kids Yet). And it feels like a long time since I last saw it....

    Even if I were to use it, I wouldn't use it as an attribute of "family": I'd be more likely to say something like "They're a couple of DINKIES/dinkies".

    To be honest, I wouldn't understand Silver's sentences:(.

    ..........

    EDIT: On DINK vs DINKY, I've just found this in Wiki:
    DINKY is occasionally used (in the UK, Canada, India, and China) to describe a high-earning couple who choose not to have children and are therefore able to afford a more expensive consumer lifestyle than those with families. The term was coined during the 1980s, at the height of "yuppie" culture. [...]

    A version of the acronym, DINK, is still used in the United States, South Korea, and Japan; especially for a subset of yuppies. DINK is sometimes used in reference to gay and lesbian couples who are childless. [...]
     
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    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't think I've ever heard "DINK" or "DINKY" in conversation and I haven't seen either in print for a long time. They strike me as rather "journalistic" words; not the sort of words you'll hear on the high street.
     
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    Merrit

    Senior Member
    English
    When the word 'yuppie(s)' was popular in journalistic circles, quite a few 'clones' arose, some seriously, but many in mockery. For example, SINBAD stands for Single Income, No Boyfriend, And Desperate - not a polite way to describe any lady.

    m
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I assumed that dinky in this sense is passé?

    The main meaning of the word for me is 'small and stylish', but beware - AmE speakers attach a different connotation to it. See also this thread:

    dinky
     
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    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Dink is one of those too-cute acronyms that pop up occasionally and don't serve too much purpose (/personal opinion). I don't use it for that reason and because it was a well-known racial slur for Vietnamese during the Vietnam War (or American War, if you were on the North Vietnamese side).
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I agree with Sound Shift (post #7). I wouldn't use DINK or any of the other similar acronyms, either in conversation or journalistically. In my opinion, they're cute coinages but not well known to more than a handful of people, and they are not of much value in communicating with anyone.
     
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