dip in the water

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zhonglin

Senior Member
Mandarin
Hi Folks,

Can we say "dip in the water" to mean stay in the water? For example, "my friend does not know how to swim so he just dipped in the water at the beach" Does my sentence sound fine?
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    To take a dip or go for a dip implies that you don't stay in the water long, although the expression is vague. We don't usually use the verb "dip" in this context.
     

    zhonglin

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thanks folks, so I can say Wade/paddle" this way

    1) I'll just wade in the water when we get to the beach
    2) I'll just paddle in the water when we get to the beach
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If you say 'water' when you at the beach, it would mean 'the sea'. But if you said it anywhere else, 'water' might mean 'river' or 'lake' or swimming pool' etc.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    In the far north-east of England we used the term 'splodging' for paddling in the sea, or the lake or the river.
    It's possible to paddle in any sort of water. It means 'walking in the water' rather than 'swimming'. As it happens, British people are less likely to be swimming in rivers or lakes than at the seaside.
    Nowhere is very far from the sea in Britain, a narrow island.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Yes. In BE, at least, the second one sounds more natural for when you are at the beach. These people are paddling:

    We seem to have a clear AE/BE difference here. In American English, the people walking in water around their ankles are wading, and nothing else. They would never be described as "paddling". If anyone said "I was paddling in the water at the beach", one would most likely understand that the person was either doing this:



    or else this:

     
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