direct field goal vs indirect field goal (football)

morkovanka

Member
Russian
Hi to everybody,

I´d be greatful if someone could explain the meaning of the following football terms to me. The ones I am interested in are direct field goal and indirect field goal. They apprear in a match analysis report with lots of statistical data included. The SHOTS section states:

How they (players) get to shoot:
- shots from a play iniciated: 6
- shots from indirect field goal: 3
- shots from direct field goal: 2


My basic questions are:

1. Whether the use of the above mentioned terms is common in English (related to the sphere of football)
2. The meaning of both.

Thank you very much in advance for your help.
 
  • morkovanka

    Member
    Russian
    Well, I did found it in the Internet, it's a pdf document that presents the analysis of the World Cup 2006 final match between France and Brasil. I would gladly give you the link to the page but the forum won't allow me to do so as I am still a novice here (the forum rule states I cannot post any links to other web pages before I have at least 30 posts here). It seems as I canot attach the documnet either as its size exceed the maximum allowed. The only thing I can think of is: google the "direct field goal", you´ll get no more than 7 results, the document I am talking about will be the 2nd or the 3d in the list, appearing under the name of FRANCE-BRAZIL.

    Thanks to everyone again for all your help.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I've looked at your document, morkovanka, and remain puzzled. It's not in the language used in BE to describe soccer. It seems to be written by someone whose first language in AE and who is unfamiliar with the game.

    Most puzzling is 'shots from direct field goal' as opposed to 'shots from indirect field goal'. I thought for a moment that it might mean 'shots on target' but it's in the category 'how did they get to shoot', so I thought it may be from a pass, but they use the word pass elsewhere.

    Shots from a play initiated, shots from direct field goal, shots from indirect field goal, these are the three ways they get to shoot. My best guess would be shots from a solo run, shots from a pass from a team-mate, shots from a deflection off an opponent.
     

    morkovanka

    Member
    Russian
    Thanks, panjandrum, for placing the link. True, I tried to locate the document I was talking about in a most funny way=) Thanks, Thomas Tompion, for guessing the meaning of badly translated terms and for explaining it to me. The thing is that we have a more or less similar football match analysis software, thus, it is equally important for me to know the meaning of the terms they use (so as to understand how they organize the statistical data) and to make sure that the terms they use are adecuate in order to avoid the same mistakes our competitors seem to have made when working out the software interface..... Thanks again=)
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Is the subject not related to rugby, rather than football?
    I don't think so gasman. The quoted text is from a Digital Soccer Project.

    There are versions in other languages - German, Italian and French.
    It might be useful to look at the other versions to see if that helps.
    It wouldn't help me, but then I don't speak German, Italian or French.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't think so gasman. The quoted text is from a Digital Soccer Project.

    There are versions in other languages - German, Italian and French.
    It might be useful to look at the other versions to see if that helps.
    It wouldn't help me, but then I don't speak German, Italian or French.
    Panj. I've looked at the French version, which is about as strange as the English one - unfortunately they don't give the Italian one unless you subscribe:

    How they (players) get to shoot:

    shots from a play iniciated: Tirs concluant une action (The French helps here; it mean shots at the end of a movement)​

    - shots from indirect field goal: Tirs indirects/coup de pied arrêté (The French is as obscure as the English it means: indirect shots/kick stopped - can this mean indirect free kick? - not very easily if one looks at the third example)

    - shots from direct field goal: Tirs directs sur coup de pied arrêté (which means direct shots on kick stopped)​

    We might find out if we knew what the Italian for a free kick was, and fed that into the right automatic translator.​
     

    morkovanka

    Member
    Russian
    I found the Italian version (the original one since the company is Italian) and consulted a girl who speaks the Italian language as concerns the terms in question. I guess we managed to work it out together. It seems that the direct field goal and the indirect field goal stand for direct free kick and indirect free kick respectively. Now at least it makes some sense: the terms are used to describe different types of shots on goal.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I found the Italian version (the original one since the company is Italian) and consulted a girl who speaks the Italian language as concerns the terms in question. I guess we managed to work it out together. It seems that the direct field goal and the indirect field goal stand for direct free kick and indirect free kick respectively. Now at least it makes some sense: the terms are used to describe different types of shots on goal.
    Thanks for this, Morkovanka. Yes, it was clear a few posts back that it meant how they got to shoot, and the first one means at the end of a move.

    What worried me about the indirect free kick is that the whole point of an indirect free kick is that one cannot score directly from them, so there's no point in shooting, unless one thinks that the ball might be deflected, or that the goalie might be foolish and try, without success though while touching the ball, to save the shot.

    That's not to say that your Italian friend isn't correct, however.
     

    morkovanka

    Member
    Russian
    that´s why they used FROM in the beginning of each phrase I suppose - to underline that the shot on goal resulted from an indirect free kick. There might be a few ball deflections later, after the free kick had been performed, but it was the free kick still that proceded, and thus, iniciated the shot on goal.

    Not sure I make myself clear......
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top