Dis-moi, tu passes en France ou pas du tout ?

mellytelly

New Member
English-US
can I have a translation please? I'm not sure if it means whether I've been or am planning on visiting France...:D
 
  • kiwineko

    Senior Member
    France/French
    It means "are you coming/passing in France or not at all ?"

    (note there is a mistake in the French sentence - should be "passes")
     

    whiffet

    Senior Member
    The grammar is not exactly standard.

    A better sentence would read:

    "Dis-moi si tu passes en France ou pas [du tout]."

    He's using the present tense, but, like in English, the present tense is used to express the future when you're talking about traveling.

    Thus:

    "Tell me if you're going to France or not."

    --> present progressive = "future"

    Or sorry, you beat me to it.

    It means "are you coming/passing in France or not at all ?"

    (note there is a mistake in the French sentence - should be "passes")
    We don't use the verb "to pass" like this. "To go" or "to come" is a better translation.

    Also, you don't go or come "in" a specific place. You go or come "to" a specific place.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    kiwineko

    Senior Member
    France/French
    it depends what comes after passer...
    Sorry I can't really think of a grammar rule for this at the moment, maybe someone else ?
     
    Both are used in Frenche. Differences are very small.
    Dis moi si tu passes en France cet été?
    * Colloquial. equivalent to "passe me voir un de ces jours!"
    * Or formal and expresses a short stay (a few days or weeks)
    Dis moi si tu viens en France cet été? formal.
    Dis moi si tu passes par Paris en allant à Strasbourg? formal.
    hope it helps.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top