'Disbantas' 'da pinda' and 'mo canuko'

sallyjoe

Member
UK English
Could someone please tell me what 'disbantas' 'da pinda' and 'mo canuko' mean I think I've spelt them right, they're Portuguese. Thanks

:warn: I changed the title of your thread so to make it clearer, according to rule #4 of the WR forums (see sticky thread at the top of this forum)
 
  • Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    I don't recognize those words. Either they are regional terms (Brazilian slang or African regionalisms, perhaps...), or they have been severely misspelled. :confused:
     

    sallyjoe

    Member
    UK English
    Thanks for your reply. I think I may have spelt them wrong. Here they are again.


    da pinha disbundas mo canuko


    Thanks.




    Outsider said:
    I don't recognize those words. Either they are regional terms (Brazilian slang or African regionalisms, perhaps...), or they have been severely misspelled. :confused:
     

    sallyjoe

    Member
    UK English
    Sorry I can't. They were attached to some pictures and I don't understand what they mean. I think its regional portuguese.
    araceli said:
    Could you put some context, sallyjoe?
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    It looks like netspeak, and some words remind me of Brazilian slang, but I'm not familiar with the phrases in question... Sorry. :(
     

    Lems

    Senior Member
    Brazil - Brazilian Portuguese
    Sally

    desbundar = is a Brazilian slang for causing admiration, impact.

    pinha = is a fruit in Brazil

    mo canuko ... I don't know what it means, but 'mo' and the letter 'k' (not used in Portuguese) seems a teenager talk

    Hope this helps

    Lems
    ______________________________________
    Don't drink and drive. You might spill your beer.
    :rolleyes:
     

    sallyjoe

    Member
    UK English
    Thank you for trying.
    Lems said:
    Sally

    desbundar = is a Brazilian slang for causing admiration, impact.

    pinha = is a fruit in Brazil

    mo canuko ... I don't know what it means, but 'mo' and the letter 'k' (not used in Portuguese) seems a teenager talk

    Hope this helps

    Lems
    ______________________________________
    Don't drink and drive. You might spill your beer.
    :rolleyes:
     

    vargas

    New Member
    Portugal Portuguese
    Sally,

    in Portugal, "desbunda" has a different meaning: we use it, for example, to describe something that went wild: This party was a "desbunda", meaning that everybody got crazy, doing wild things. Or when you go out with friends to a restaurant and it was a "desbunda" meaning people eat and drank a lot.

    "da pinha". Pinha is in fact a fruit - we use this word for the fruit of the pine tree. But we also use it to designate a guy's (or girl's) head to indicate that him(her) must be crazy: He is not good "da pinha", means he is crazy, not very intelligent. When he was young someone knocked him in the "pinha". Or "Doi-me a pinha" is the portuguese for "I have a headache:

    "canuko" I do not know what it is, but i see some references to this word in the internet.

    by the way: the word canuck is an offensive slang for "a french canadian".


    vargas :)
     

    jpc

    New Member
    France français
    Could someone please tell me what 'disbantas' 'da pinda' and 'mo canuko' mean I think I've spelt them right, they're Portuguese. Thanks

    :warn: I changed the title of your thread so to make it clearer, according to rule #4 of the WR forums (see sticky thread at the top of this forum)
    Para já, "mo canuko" quer dizer "o meu filho", no português de Luanda, em Angola. Posso explicar as outras palavras também, mas seria preciso dar também o contexto.
     

    spielenschach

    Senior Member
    Portugal . Portuguese
    O significado pode apenas ser suspeitado pelo sentido da frase:

    ' Maior acontecimento da tua vida:deve ter sido qdo era mais canuko a primeira vez que me vi ao espelho, devo ter desabafado "damn! sou tao munito'
     

    Odinh

    Senior Member
    Portuguese, Brasil
    Sally,

    in Portugal, "desbunda" has a different meaning: we use it, for example, to describe something that went wild: This party was a "desbunda", meaning that everybody got crazy, doing wild things. Or when you go out with friends to a restaurant and it was a "desbunda" meaning people eat and drank a lot.
    In Brazil we say 'desbunde'.
     
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