Discussions vs colloquies

Cupric

Senior Member
Turkey
What's the difference?

According to meriamwebster they're both the same.

My own made up context: "Both of you should meet up and colloquy your problems."

Would I be able to use colloquy instead of discuss?
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I think there's a significant difference. Have you looked at the dictionary definitions?

    As regards your "sentence", the answer is "No".
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Both of you should ..." says what two people should do. Doing requires a verb. Meet is a verb. Colloquy is not a verb. It cannot be used here.

    Discussion is not a verb either, but discuss is. So, you can say "Both of you should meet and discuss your problems."
     

    Cupric

    Senior Member
    Turkey
    "Both of you should ..." says what two people should do. Doing requires a verb. Meet is a verb. Colloquy is not a verb. It cannot be used here.

    Discussion is not a verb either, but discuss is. So, you can say "Both of you should meet and discuss your problems."
    That's really an interesting answer.. Can we talk in PM I have more to discuss.
     

    Cupric

    Senior Member
    Turkey
    I think there's a significant difference. Have you looked at the dictionary definitions?

    As regards your "sentence", the answer is "No".
    Could you explain why..? According to Google definition it is a formal conversation, so a serious conversation.. And I don't know why are you conceding it as incorrect?

    If I said "Please take your discussions in a private meeting."

    Can we say "Please take your colloquies in a private meeting." instead?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Could you explain why..?
    The main difference is, as Egmont said in #4, that "colloquy" isn't a verb. You can't use it in the same way as "discuss" which is a verb.

    You could probably say "Both of you should meet and have a colloquy on your problems" however but "discussion" is the word most people would choose.

    Can we say "Please take your colloquies in a private meeting." instead?
    "Please take your colloquies to a private meeting".

    Yes, that would work but I suspect most people would either ask you what you mean or run off to consult a dictionary or say they don't speak French.
    (Perhaps you shouldn't take what I say too seriously as I belong to the second category.)
     
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    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Colloquy' is not used to mean 'discuss', nor is 'colloquy'/colloquium' used to mean 'discussion'.
    Such usage is not correct because the words are not used this way in everyday English, whatever the dictionary suggests. Nothing is being 'conceded'.

    I have never once heard the words used as synonyms for discuss/discussion outside a specialised 'jargon' context of academic discussions. Most people would have no idea what you were talking about.
     

    Cupric

    Senior Member
    Turkey
    <-----Threads have been merged at this point by moderator (Florentia52)----->

    I made up this sentence:

    "My friends were having a colloquy about which game we should play next."


    Instead of conversation.

    Does it sound pretentious/awkward/weird/odd?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    <-----Threads have been merged at this point by moderator (Florentia52)----->

    I made up this sentence:

    "My friends were having a colloquy about which game we should play next."


    Instead of conversation.

    Does it sound pretentious/awkward/weird/odd?
    I had to look it up in a dictionary. :eek:

    Yes, it does sound pretentious. As well as being the wrong word to use in this context.

    Keep it simple - stick to 'conversation', or 'discussion'.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Yes, it sounds all of those things in that context. Colloquy is a very formal word; it is most often used in specific situations such as academic conferences and legal proceedings.
     

    Cupric

    Senior Member
    Turkey
    Yes, it sounds all of those things in that context. Colloquy is a very formal word; it is most often used in specific situations such as academic conferences and legal proceedings.
    How did you know that?

    Can you please tell me how you figured out when the word is used? (even in PM would be nice if you want I don't mind)

    Thanks in advance.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    How did you know that?

    Can you please tell me how you figured out when the word is used? (even in PM would be nice if you want I don't mind)
    Native speakers know how words are used by speaking English all our lives. You have to learn these things by asking, reading, watching movies, etc. You cannot learn these things by reading dictionaries.
     
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