disease-ridden

  • Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Disease-ridden? E' proprio un rottame! :D
    Scusa, non bisogna scherzare su queste cose... però credo definisca uno pieno di malattie o che ne ha sempre una, non mi viene in mente una parola in italiano... se non slang tipo catorcio ecc.
     

    ikester

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    silviap said:
    Disease-ridden? E' proprio un rottame! :D
    Scusa, non bisogna scherzare su queste cose... però credo definisca uno pieno di malattie o che ne ha sempre una, non mi viene in mente una parola in italiano... se non slang tipo catorcio ecc.
    In Napoli, we would compare such a person to la ciucca di Fichella (Fichella's donkey), who has novantanove piaghe e pure la coda fracida (ninety nine plague sores and a rotten tail to boot). It's a colorful tongue-in-cheek saying frequently heard in the Neapolitan dialect to describe a hypochondriac, a chronic complainer, or someone who actually does have a seemingly endless string of ailments. But I digress... ;)

    In reference to the original question, the term disease-ridden is often used in English to describe something like rats on a carrion heap, a house full of heroin-addicted prostitutes or a pile of unwashed linens in a third-world hospital... it conjures an image of an unsanitary, visibly decrepit, and somewhat frightening situation.

    (Sorry for the unpleasant imagery, but perhaps it will help one of the mother tongue Italians to come up with a suitable term.)

    ciao!
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    però credo definisca uno pieno di malattie


    o che ne ha sempre una, non mi viene in mente una parola in italiano... se non slang tipo catorcio ecc.
    no.

    disease-ridden descrive una persona che ha molte malattie contemporaneamente, o che ne ha una dappertutto. Example: His cancer had spread so thoroughly and aggressively; his disease-ridden body could not battle it and he succumbed.
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Averne sempre una is an idiomatic expression.

    Possibile che ne hai sempre una?!

    Ike, I don't see how those images might help! :eek:
    They are scary :eek: I don't know how the concept of desease-ridden can be associated to dirty linens or a house of prostitutes...
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hmm, the meaning is wider... it means something like: Is it possible that there's always something wrong with you? Or there's something on with you? I'm not sure, mainly because I don't know if there's an idiomatic English expression for that.

    Forse con degli esempi, si riesce a capire meglio.

    A = Possiamo vederci lunedì?
    B = No, lunedì non posso, ho lezione di pianoforte
    A = Martedì?
    B = Neanche martedì... vado a giocare a tennis
    A = Facciamo per mercoledì o giovedì?
    B = No, mi spiace: mercoledì ho gli allenamenti di basket e giovedì c'è un concerto
    A = Ma possibile che ne hai sempre una?!

    C = Sai che Giorgio è a casa con la bronchite?
    D = Ancora?
    C = Guarda che non l'ha mai avuta! Quella che aveva prima era la polmonite! Anzi ultimamente ha avuto l'otite...
    D = Ho perso il conto... ne ha sempre una!
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    Maybe you mean a hypochondriac, someone who always complains of one ailment or another. But how does that help with disease-ridden? We use disease-ridden only in serious, dire circumstances.
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    lsp, I was only trying to explain the meaning of that idiomatic phrase, because apparently you have not understood it. And no, it doesn't mean hypochondriac: did you read my examples?
     

    ikester

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    ikester said:
    ...a house full of heroin-addicted prostitutes or a pile of unwashed linens in a third-world hospital...
    silviap said:
    Ike, I don't see how those images might help! :eek:
    They are scary :eek: I don't know how the concept of desease-ridden can be associated to dirty linens or a house of prostitutes...
    The term disease-ridden can be used to describe an individual, as in lsp's example, but it is also used to describe anything laden with germs or bacteria that create the risk of spreading diseases.

    BTW, Merriam Webster dictionary defines ridden in this combined form as "excessively full of."
     
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