disgust vs. get disgusted vs. gross out vs. get grossed out

zaffy

Senior Member
Polish
disgust vs. get disgusted vs. gross out vs. get grossed out

Do these four examples work and are all natural?

-Sorry to say this but your tattoos disgust me.
-Sorry to say this but I get disgusted with your tattoos.

-Sorry to say this but your tattoos gross me out.
-Sorry to say this but I get grossed out with your tattoos.
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    These are all more or less equivalent:

    -Sorry to say this but your tattoos disgust me.
    -Sorry to say this but your tattoos gross me out.
    -Sorry to say this but I get grossed out by your tattoos.

    "Disgusted with" usually means "fed up with, tired of." "Disgusted by" is slightly better but still ambiguous.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I am disgusted by tattoos on Caucasians. They make me feel physically sick; not as sick as piercings make me feel, but ... . I pronounce 'disgust' with a hard 'g' sound distinct from 'discussed'.
    I would never, ever, not in a million years, say either 'disgusted' or 'grossed out' talking a tattooed person. That would be incredibly rude.
     

    Gundagai

    Member
    English
    I'm thinking that "get disgusted" is probably less used. You could however say "get upset" or "get sad". Disgusted is an opinion. Upset or sad is a state of mind.

    Also I use a "g" sound for disgust and a "k" sound for discussed, 'cos that's how they're spelled.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Would you use 'get disgusted' ?
    No, I get the impression that AE "to be grossed out", and "to get (become) disgusted" are the same thing, but "become/get disgusted" is not idiomatic in this context in BE.

    BE would use "And my mum would be really disgusted..."
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    I ordinarily pronounce discussed and disgust the same way (with a -k- sound). I associate "gross out" with teenagers in the early 1960s; I doubt that respectable adult Americans say it in respectable grown-up conversation.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Also I use a "g" sound for disgust and a "k" sound for discussed, 'cos that's how they're spelled.
    I also pronounce discussed and disgust the same way
    So looks like it differs between BE speakers :)


    And two opinions of BE speakers from a different forum:
    "g for me anyway"
    "definitely pronounce disgust with a g (why would you pronounce a k when it's spelt with a g???)."
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Don't they pronounce disgusting with a 'k' in both BE and AE?
    If you look at the IPA, there is no /k/.
    I pronounce it with a ‘k’ - diss-kuss-ting.
    I'm imagining Sir Les Patterson saying "disgusting" :D - I would still hear a hard (and sharp, short) /g/. [Edit: or, at least, that's how I would translate it in my mind's ear.]
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    No. To me, it is still a hard, sharp /g/. If you make the attempt and pronounce /k/ clearly, the word sounds wrong.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    No. To me, it is still a hard, sharp /g/. If you make the attempt and pronounce /k/ clearly, the word sounds wrong.
    Well, I see, natives will always have more sensitive ears as for their own language. I do hear a 'k' there. :( I asked another BE speaker to play the pronunciation examples and he said the same:

    Don't know if it's because I'm expecting it or not but I have listened to all of the samples several times and I can hear the G in all of them. I'll agree that the sound is not as hard a G as you might find in other words, but none of them sound like diskusting to me. However, s followed by a g followed by a vowel is a fairly unusual combination and naturally seems to soften/flatten the g a bit.

    To me, disgust and discussed sound very similar but definitely not identical. - I can hear the difference between the g and the c (I just asked some family members to say both words - clearly different).

    Just did a blind test. They said the words randomly and I wrote down what I thought they'd said and we compared lists. It's not a fair test because they knew the purpose but, in this probably flawed little experiment, I got it right every time.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Part of what's going on here is that we - English speakers- tend to assume that what we say reflects the spelling. But that may not be true....

    You hear /k/ in both disgust and discussed. I hear /g/ in both disgust and discussed. I suspect we're both right!:)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Seriously, if you were given only the words "disgust" and "discussed", I would not have been able to tell the difference. If you were able to tell the difference, I would, myself, say that there was something wrong with the test...
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top