dismiss someone

Graine de Moutarde

Senior Member
American English
Hi all!


I'm searching for how to say 'to dismiss' someone, as in to tell someone they can leave or to say goodbye to someone--not the definition of 'to write off something or someone' or 'to fire someone.'

Context: A man is working late with his employer and they leave the office together. Once they're outside, the man waits for his employer to dismiss him, as in perhaps simply say goodnight, or 'that will be all for tonight' or even give him a small to-do list before work the next day.

Original sentence: 'I waited silently beside her, expecting her to dismiss me.'

I should clarify, the two are actually good friends, but it's confusing to the guy when his employer plans to be friendly and when she is going to be 'strictly business'.

So, my attempts are as follows:

1. m'attendant à ce qu'elle me dise bon soir
2. attendant qu'elle me donne congé
3. attendant qu'elle me laisse partir.

I'm leaning towards either 1 or 2, but I would greatly appreciate whatever assistance you can give me!

~~~GdeM
 
  • Michelvar

    quasimodo
    French from France
    Hi,

    for an employee in this situation (I mean, when the relationships includes that he can not leave the room without having been dismissed), I would use the second one.

    (btw, it would be "bonsoir", not "bon soir".
     

    Graine de Moutarde

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thanks for the clarification, Michelvar, but I'm still not too sure....

    Looking over the text again, the guy and his employer are not actually working late together, but they both happen to be working late and leave at the same time. So, it's already past closing and technically the guy has the right to leave when he wants, but, he and his employer strike up a conversation on their way out the building, and I think the employer is waiting for any closing statements from his boss, before they go their separate ways....if that makes any sense.... :-/

    For example, as I saw earlier in the story, a situation similar to this occurred and the boss just tossed her employee a casual 'I'll see you tomorrow.' So, I think maybe the author meant 'dismiss' as in simply say goodbye or some final departing statement. It's hard to say, given that I've noticed that sometimes I have to guess what the author really means to say....
     

    Graine de Moutarde

    Senior Member
    American English
    Salut à nouveau, Petites mousctaches! :)

    Well, the whole scene (or basically the paragraph and dialogue) is as follows:

    We went down the elevator and out of the quiet building. Outside, the chilly night sky was already studded with stars. I waited silently beside her, expecting her to dismiss me.

    "Where do you go drinking in your spare time?" She suddenly asked.
    "Montparnasse, usually," I said, caught off guard.
    "Take me there, then," she said as we headed for her car. "You'll want to have dinner as well."

    As I said, the two are good friends, but sometimes, I think, it's a bit awkward for the guy, this alternating between good friends and co-workers.

    Hope this helps! :)
     

    boterham

    Senior Member
    French, France
    parce que ça n'est pas elle qui s'en va, c'est elle qui autorise l'employé à quitter la pièce, si je comprends bien.
    Ils sont déjà dehors.

    +1 pour "pensant qu'elle allait me dire au revoir".

    "pensant qu'elle allait prendre congé" works as well but is a tad more formal, don't you think?
     

    Mauricet

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Je dirais pensant qu'elle allait me congédier, vu que c'est elle la patronne et que c'est un acte d'autorité, contrairement à dire bonsoir ou prendre congé.
     

    catay

    Senior Member
    Canada anglais
    Je dirais pensant qu'elle allait me congédier, vu que c'est elle la patronne et que c'est un acte d'autorité, contrairement à dire bonsoir ou prendre congé.
    Autant qu'avec dismiss, je pense. L'ambiguïté peut être voulue ...
    I agree...A teacher dismisses a pupil, an officer gives the order to dismiss to a subordinate. This is not a suggestion for translation, but perhaps another way of putting it:
    En attendant qu'elle me dise « Rompez! »:rolleyes:
     
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