dispense with

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Alexander2

Senior Member
Russian
One dictionary contains the following definition:

trade off, get rid of by trading.

Is it correct to replace the phrase "get rid of" with "dispense with"? (The phrase "get rid of" sounds informal to me.)

trade off, dispense with of by trading.
 
  • Alexander2

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thank you. The definitions given in other dictionaries may be more precise. So I can accept the definition “to exchange something for or with another” instead of “dispense with by trading.”
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, I’m sure it’s used in slightly different ways. But I wouldn’t have thought of it in terms of “getting rid of” something. You may find it useful to look at definitions of the noun, trade-off.
     

    Alexander2

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The definition of the phrase might have been an opinion of the compiler of the dictionary. I also often understand the word "off" used with a verb as implying that something is completed or disposed of.
     

    Alexander2

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Or it may have been a definition related to the context of stock markets?
    There is nothing else said in connection with that phrase in Cynthia Barnhart's Student's Dictionary of American English. It simply defines the phrase "trade off" along with some other phrases, such as "trade in," "trade on," and "trade up," which the dictionary does not link with stock markets.
     
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