Displace/Dislocate/Dislodge/Uproot?

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sambistapt

Senior Member
Brazilian Portuguese
Hello amigos!:)

Many families were displaced/dislocated/dislodged/uprooted during the war.

Can I use them interchangeably? Is there a sizeable difference among them?

Thanks,

Sam:cool:
 
  • kelt

    Senior Member
    Czech Republic, Czech
    I only heared displaced in this sense. I'd say dislocated/dislodged can be used if you twist you arm so that it comes out of the joint.
    Uprooted sounds too formal for this, as in: They tried to uproot the customs of theirs.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I think uprooted and displaced are both fine. I agree with kelt that "dislocated" sounds like a joint gone wrong. :) "Dislodged" refers to something that was tightly stuck that came loose, in my experience.
     

    Sogardres

    Member
    Spanish-Spain
    Hi!

    Could you use 'dislodge' instead of 'dislocate' when talking about your jaw?

    'He dislodge his jaw' instead of 'He dislocated his jaw'?

    Thanks
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    Could you use 'dislodge' instead of 'dislocate' when talking about your jaw?
    No. 'Dislocate' is the usual word regarding body parts being... dislocated :)

    Generally, if something is "dislodged" it becomes completely separated from the place where it was, usually somewhere it was stuck.

    Zenzo kicked the ball onto the roof, where it became stuck. We dislodged it with a long pole.


    "Dislodge" can also be used in the context of warfare.

    The enemy machine-gunners felt secure in their position behind the rocks, but we dislodged them with tear-gas.
     
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