dispose of rubbish into/in the rubbish bin

EdisonBhola

Senior Member
Korean
Just now I saw this sign in a public toilet:

Please dispose of rubbish into the rubbish bin.


I think this is wrong because of "into". I think it should be "in". Because "dispose of" cannot go with "into", while "throw" can.

Am I right? :):)
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Perhaps you could tell us where you saw it? For example, in which country? It is wrong in BE, but there may be variants of English in which it might be acceptable.
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Is my reasoning correct? We say "throw into" because "throw" involves movements and "into" also involves movements. "Dispose of" doesn't so cannot go with "into".
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Please dispose of rubbish into the rubbish bin. should be considered in the same way that headlines in newspapers are considered: the minimum number of words to convey a message.

    The notice should be "Please dispose of your rubbish by putting it into the bin."
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    . should be considered in the same way that headlines in newspapers are considered: the minimum number of words to convey a message.

    The notice should be "Please dispose of your rubbish by putting it into the bin."
    No it shouldn't, it should be Please put rubbish in the bin. Why would it need to be any longer than that? If you really want to use "dispose" then Please dispose of rubbish in the bin provides the instruction perfectly well.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Or maybe I can remove "of" and write:
    Please dispose rubbish into the bin. "Dispose....into" seem correct.
    No, I am afraid not. The fact is, your original perception was correct.
    We say "throw into" because "throw" involves movements and "into" also involves movements. "Dispose of" doesn't so cannot go with "into". :tick:
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    No it shouldn't, it should be Please put rubbish in the bin. Why would it need to be any longer than that?
    that would do or even "into" which indicates the motion.
    If you really want to use "dispose"
    In all fairness, it was the sign writer, not I, who used "dispose".
    then Please dispose of rubbish in the bin provides the instruction perfectly well.
    Strangely, I saw that as a polite imperative to the cleaner. :)
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Paul, I was using "you" in its current meaning of the obsolete "one". There's perhaps two points in the thread. The correct preposition, as EdisonBhola recognised, is "in", and a native English speaker would be unlikely to use "dispose" in this context.
     
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