Disrobe/ Undress/take off/?

sambistapt

Senior Member
Brazilian Portuguese
Hello amigos!:)

I was asked to disrobe/undress/take off my clothes when I visit a Nudism camp.

I know they are synominous however I still wonder if there is a slight difference among them?

Thanks,

Sam:cool:
 
  • wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    take off is transitive. You have to take something off/take off something (your clothes, your shoes, etc.)

    undress, disrobe or strip are intransitive. Undress is standard; disrobe sounds clinical; strip is more colloquial or even sounds sexual.
     
    Last edited:

    magic88

    Member
    English - Canadian
    I agree with Wildan1.

    Examples:

    She undressed and stepped into the shower.
    The patient was asked to disrobe.
    He took off his shoes before stepping into the house.

    'Disrobe' and 'undress' sounds more formal than 'take off'.
     

    una madre

    Senior Member
    Western Canada English
    I agree with wildan1 & magic88.

    You'll rarely hear the word "disrobe" in general conversation about taking off your clothes.
     
    Last edited:

    reka39

    Banned
    Italian
    Hello!
    I need help with prepositions. I want to say: "I took off the coat to my child" (=I helped my child, because he's young and he hasn't learnt to do it alone) , is that correct? or would I need to use "from my child"? Thanks!
     
    Last edited:

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I don't think you can use to in that sentence. If you need to, from could be used: I took my child's coat off (from him). Or you could say it differently: I helped my child off his coat.
     

    reka39

    Banned
    Italian
    I don't think you can use to in that sentence. If you need to, from could be used: I took my child's coat off (from him). Or you could say it differently: I helped my child off his coat.
    Thanks!
    If I say "I took off my child's coat off" - doesn't seem that I was wearing the coat of my child?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Thanks!
    If I say "I took off my child's coat off" - doesn't seem that I was wearing the coat of my child?
    Only one off should be used: I took off my child's coat or I took my child's coat off. :)

    It is ambiguous, I agree. Usually though a child's coat will be too small for the parent (in the case of a child needing help with undressing)! So the context might make the meaning clear.
     
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