Distressed vs. frayed vs. worn out

jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
Dick: Why the collar of your shirt is fluffy?
Tom: Because it's "distressed" or "frayed" or "worn out". I have worn it for 5 years.

Are they all correct? If so, which is the best? Thank you.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Tom: Because it's "distressed" or "frayed" or "worn out". I have worn it for 5 years.
    Because you added "I have worn it for 5 years", only "frayed" and "worn out" work.

    The default meaning of "distressed," in the context of fabrics, is that [the surface of] the fabric has been abraded to give the appearance that a new garment is old or well-worn.

    Please note that all the adjectives have different meanings, so it is not possible to say which is best.

    Also please note how to ask questions in English. Your question is very "Chinese" and is wrong in English.
    Dick: Why the collar of your shirt is fluffy?:cross: Dick: Why is the collar of your shirt fluffy? :tick:
    :thumbsup:
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I agree with Pauls description, however I will add two images: Frayed (and not mentioned "pilling")

    This is an example of a frayed


    More frequently on men's dress shirts is a condition known as "pilling" where tiny balls of lint are adhered to the fabric.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Jeans are often distressed. They can be put in a tumbler with rocks and spend time going around and around until they are "distressed".
     
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