distressed with running

Gabriel Aparta

Senior Member
Español - Venezuela
Hi, please, from Dracula by Bram Stoker:

As I sat I heard a sound in the courtyard without, the agonised cry of a woman. I rushed to the window, and throwing it up, peered between the bars.

There, indeed, was a woman with dishevelled hair, holding her hands over her heart as one distressed with running. She was leaning against the corner of the gateway. When she saw my face at the window she threw herself forward, and shouted in a voice laden with menace, "Monster, give me my child!

I don't quite get that, should I assume that she was running and she is tired?

Thanks!
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    She was holding her hands over her chest and looked as if she had been running and was gasping for breath as a result. I don't think it necessarily means that she had been running, only that she looked like it. She could have been.

    Cross-posted.
     

    Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Hi, please, from Dracula by Bram Stoker:

    As I sat I heard a sound in the courtyard without, the agonised cry of a woman. I rushed to the window, and throwing it up, peered between the bars.

    There, indeed, was a woman with dishevelled hair, holding her hands over her heart as one distressed with running. She was leaning against the corner of the gateway. When she saw my face at the window she threw herself forward, and shouted in a voice laden with menace, "Monster, give me my child!

    I don't quite get that, should I assume that she was running and she is tired?

    Thanks!
    No. The key word here is as. As one distressed with running = she is acting in a way similar to a person distressed by running.

    ... or at least how people might have acted when the novel was written. I don't recall seeing runners at the end of a race holding their hands over their hearts, unless they have a more serious problems!
     
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