distribute /di'stribju:t/ OR /'distribju:t/

  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    On behalf of my 60,000,000 countrymen, Audi, I would like to say that I have no idea.
    On my own behalf, I would like to say that I use both*, depending on which way the wind is blowing.

    *Though obviously not both at once: that would be daft.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    I can't tell the difference -- can you? I may have split the syllables wrong, but I'm positive that the word is stressed on the second syllable.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    There are people in the UK who accent this word on the first syllable???
    Well, there's me. And then there are 59,999,999 other people who seem to have gone to bed.

    I thought that it is /di' stribju:t/, not /dis' tribju:t/....:confused:
    Please open a separate thread for 'English syllabification: How do I do it?', Audi. (No, don't ~ we'd never hear the end of it.)
     
    Last edited:

    Wobby

    Senior Member
    English [England]
    Hey! I have also been known to put the stress on the first syllable of 'distribute'. Actually, almost always. I think I only put the stress on the second syllable in 'distributor'. :confused:
     

    Toadie

    Senior Member
    English
    There are people in the UK who accent this word on the first syllable???

    Fascinating; I had no idea. This is something I have never heard in my life in the US.
    I'm in the same boat as you.

    The only time I've ever heard the "dis" stressed is in the noun form, "distribution".
     

    branchsnapper

    Member
    English - South England
    I agree with Ewie, I think the British are so confused about this issue that they cannot even easily answer the question when referring to themselves individually.
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I DIStribute, but I read the disTRIBution. But then I have a mixture of backgrounds.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Personal usage (again):
    verb ~ distribute, distribute
    noun ~ distribution
    person ~ distributor
    adjective ~ distributory.
    I've still no idea why the anomaly with the verb.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    My personal usage is the same as ewie's, except that I always stress the verb on the second syllable (not the same at all, then, Loob).
     

    veracity

    Senior Member
    Excuse me, but no answer arrived to thread #8. Which is the same that I am interested in.
    The narrower problem is whether there is a difference between pronunciation di'stribju:t and dis'tribute. It also drives me asking whether distribute and tribute are somehow derived from one another? Dis - privative prefix?
     

    PMS-CC

    Senior Member
    Either I watch too much BBC or my father lied about being Canadian. Both sound correct to me and I've certainly used both forms, but I prefer to emphasize the second syllable.

    As for that latter pronunciation, it is di'stribju:t and NOT dis'tribju:t
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Muttering frantically ... ...
    I was at first going to say I put the stress on the second syllable.
    Now, after much muttering, I've decided that I can't tell which of the three syllables is stressed and I wonder - is this a word that I pronounce with equal stress on all three syllables OR am I going mad?
     

    out2lnch

    Senior Member
    English-Canada
    Personal usage (again):
    verb ~ distribute, distribute
    noun ~ distribution
    person ~ distributor
    adjective ~ distributory.
    I've still no idea why the anomaly with the verb.
    I do the same thing with the verb. I've been called on my pronunciation of this before, and only then realised that I often stress the first syllable. Sometimes though, I'm aware that I use the other. It's weird when you realise something like this mid-sentence and pause to reflect while still talking...

    Unlike gasman, I only come from one background, and it happens to not be British.
     
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