"distribute this infor to all who it may concern" (PRONOMS) [pronouns]

lux_

Senior Member
I just received this mail at work.
But I wonder if that "who" is correct.
I don't think so actually.
Shouldn't it be "whom?" Or maybe "to all of whom"?

Could you please explain me how these pronoms work? I remember some time ago I tried to study them, but as if I'm still having doubts, it means I have never found any website who could effectively clarify them for me.

Thank you!
 
  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Well, a simple rule to follow is to see whether it is possible to replace who/whom with he/him.
    He is the man. -> Who is the man?
    It may concern him. -> It may concern whom?

    Having said that, this rule is broken so often that it's hardly a rule any more.

    To answer your question - yes, I think you can use whom instead of who. I even think you should :)

    And why "infor"? I normally say "info" informally or go all the way - "information"...
     

    lux_

    Senior Member
    Well, a simple rule to follow is to see whether it is possible to replace who/whom with he/him.
    He is the man. -> Who is the man?
    It may concern him. -> It may concern whom?

    Having said that, this rule is broken so often that it's hardly a rule any more.

    To answer your question - yes, I think you can use whom instead of who. I even think you should :)

    And why "infor"? I normally say "info" informally or go all the way - "information"...
    Indeed it was "information" originally, but then it was too long for the title so I had to truncate it. And I did it wrong :D.

    Thanks for the input!
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    "Whom," the accusative case of "who," has been losing currency for some time. The only accusative forms that persist in English are "me," "her," "him," "us" and "them." Even careful speakers seem to have have forgotten "whom," although it can still be encountered in formal writing.
     
    Last edited:

    Eltheza

    Senior Member
    English - England (Midlands)
    No, lux, it's not wrong at all, but it's wrong with to whom it may concern, which is a set expression and doesn't need all for the reasons I mentioned above.

    In this sentence: I have four best friends, all of whom are abroad at the moment in... it's absolutely fine:))!
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Eltheza's example, "all of whom are..." is one of the few instances where most English speakers, even we Americans, would feel obliged to use "whom." I find it difficult to imagine anyone saying "all of who."
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    To whom it may concern = to everyone with an interest in this (matter).
    There is no doubt that this is the set expression, of course. :) Our office issues official documents under that heading all the time :)

    I was only trying to help with the particular phrasing and the long disused rule. :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top