disturbed and batey

susanna76

Senior Member
Romanian
Hi,

Does "batey" come from bat? But then it's "batey," not "batty." So maybe it means something else? Couldn't find it in the dictionaries.

I found it in the sentence:
"I certainly didn't want Caro disturbed and batey."
(Catherine Alliott, The Secret Life of Evie Hamilton)

The context is this: a guy will be bringing a horse to someone's property, and offers to take her straight to the stables. Evie agrees, because she doesn't want to bother her sister-in-law Caro, in whose stable the horse will be staying. (Caro is "frightfully busy.")

Thanks!
 
  • rizhenka

    Member
    English - Britain
    I agree - OED online says 'bate' is slang for "A fit of bad temper; a rage." So batey is the adjective of that. It is also quite dated, certainly not found in general use for a few decades I shouldn't think.
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Thank you both! It's good to know it's a dated word. I wouldn't have known since it's used in a contemporary novel that takes place in the present. Maybe the writer herself picked it up from older books. She does have an extensive vocabulary.

    Thanks again!
     
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