Diva

timpeac

Senior Member
English (England)
(In English) if a man behaves like a diva should/can he be described as a "diva"? Perhaps you can say "male diva"? Or perhaps it should be "divo" or would this generally not be understood, although it might be more faithful to the grammar of the original Italian? Would that sound pretentious?
 
  • timpeac said:
    (In English) if a man behaves like a diva should/can he be described as a "diva"? Perhaps you can say "male diva"? Or perhaps it should be "divo" or would this generally not be understood, although it might be more faithful to the grammar of the original Italian? Would that sound pretentious?
    Hi Timpeac,

    Allow an old Queen to express an opinion.

    Word Ref Dictionary gives 'divo' as the equivalent of 'diva', meaning a showbusiness celebrity.

    With regard to a man behaving like a diva, I can think of one or two 'queen like' expressions which perhaps it wouldn't be fitting to mention here. :)

    Maybe someone bold will come along to help.

    Meanwhile, I'm off on a date with a scuba-diva. :D

    Greetings (and thanks for the earlier pardon re 'chat').

    La Reine V
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    ~chuckle~
    I can think of a couple of men who would be eligible for this label.
    If I was going to use it, I would deliberately stick with diva, even if I knew about divo:) It wouldn't sound pretentious because it wouldn't be either meant, or taken, as a compliment:D
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    (compliment!)

    Maybe calling the man a drama queen would get your meaning across to more people - unless you move in opera circles.
     
    panjandrum said:
    ~chuckle~
    I can think of a couple of men who would be eligible for this label.
    If I was going to use it, I would deliberately stick with diva, even if I knew about divo:) It wouldn't sound pretentious because it wouldn't be either meant, or taken, as a complement:D
    Should your last word be spelled 'compliment' Panj, or does it have an esoteric meaning as 'complement'? :confused:

    Thanks,

    La Reine
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Timpeac has yet to qualify if he means diva in a literal or figurative sense. If the intent is to call someone a prima_donna, diva
    then we can have lots of fun debating primo donno vs. prima donno vs. primo donna.

    Tim, are you speaking of a legend in his own mind? God's gift to mere mortals?

    prima_donna

    a vain and temperamental person
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    cuchuflete said:
    Timpeac has yet to qualify if he means diva in a literal or figurative sense. If the intent is to call someone a prima_donna, diva
    then we can have lots of fun debating primo donno vs. prima donno vs. primo donna.

    Tim, are you speaking of a legend in his own mind? God's gift to mere mortals?

    prima_donna

    a vain and temperamental person
    I was thinking in the celebrity sense where we are used to calling women with big egos and unreasonable demands "divas" - such as Diana Ross or Mariah Carey for example. When a man behaves in that way - Russell Crowe for example wanting to read his poem out, or the artist formerly known as Prince changing his name to a symbol, is he a "diva", "a male diva", a "divo", something else?
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    la reine victoria said:
    narcissist - any good, Timpeac? Or do you definitely want to allude to the show business connection?

    La Reine V
    Yes, I was specifically thinking of the showbizz angle, but these other ideas are interesting - I deliberately didn't want to narrow down the discussion to start with which is why I initially asked for the masculine form of "diva", without defining further.

    I've just watched a programme about "divas" (not defined further), some of which were men, and I was wondering if that was really the appropriate term for them too. In all cases it was about "celebrities" over-reacting and being self-important.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    I was not aware that Diva has the same connotation as "prima donna".

    Currently, there is a pop/classical cross-over group called "Il Divo" - which strikes me as odd since there are 4 men in the group.

    Why not "I Divi"?
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    I've been told that everyone has an inner diva: divine Wisdom for Living, Loving and Overcoming.
     

    languageGuy

    Senior Member
    USA and English
    Originally, the prima donna was the primary role in an opera for the woman. The seconda donna was the secondary role. There are similar terms for men: primo uomo and secondo uomo. The singers who played those roles were also refered to by those titles. There was no negative connotation.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Primadonna is the insult of choice, to my ear. You can say "don't be such a primadonna" to a man, one of your buddies in the bowling league say, without raising untoward implications of screaming queendom. Diva is a little touchier in that regard, but it means much the same except it's a little funnier and not as derogatory.

    Drama queen is a much newer expression, and probably replaces primadonna for the younger generation(s). It has nothing to do with being a queen in any sense of the word, as I hear it used.

    You could also chide someone for acting like a superstar. Or ask when did God die and leave you in charge.
    .
     

    DAH

    Senior Member
    USA/California--English
    AskOxford: The word came into English from the Italian in the 19th century and originally meant 'goddess' (from a feminine form of Latin diva 'divine').

    On your 4 o'clock, check the Adonis!

    Adonis alert!
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    From Online Etymology Dict.:

    "distinguished woman singer," 1883, from It. diva "goddess, fine lady," from L. diva "goddess," fem. of divus "divine (one)."
    So be latinate, and call the pompous fellow a divus. If you catch him in mid-sentence, he will also be a divus interuptus.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    cuchuflete said:
    From Online Etymology Dict.:



    So be latinate, and call the pompous fellow a divus. If you catch him in mid-sentence, he will also be a divus interuptus.
    And if I get bored and do it just to end the conversation it'll be divus ex machina.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    timpeac said:
    ...or the artist formerly known as Prince changing his name to a symbol...
    I'm not prepared to debunk Prince's divaness, however, that one particular episode was actually about breaking sony's (I think it was sony) unwillingness to negotiate contract terms.

    Since Sony owned exclusive rights to all work product of the entertainment entity "Prince", he created a new act so he could get that monkey off his back (from his point of view).

    Again, not defending either party, but the name change, itself, wasn't an example of Divadom.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    There is no, and need not be, a male term for diva.

    Calling a man a diva pretty much conjures such an immediate image of high maintenance boy bi***, (ie Elton John) in a single short concise word.

    It has become one of the few perfectly understood and applied words in AE usage, especially when applied descriptively in the third person.
     
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