"divorce -- of nations and economies"

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grimbergen

Senior Member
Korean
Hello, members!

The Brexiteers’ campaign is also about divorce — of nations and economies, perhaps, but certainly just as permanent, and with potentially far-reaching consequences.
(http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/21/w...-from-europe-henry-viii-blazed-the-trail.html)

I am having trouble understanding this sentence exactly.

  • divorce of nations and economies: does it mean that the Bresiteers' campaign is about divorce of the UK and the EU?
  • but certainly just as permanent: does it mean 100% permanent?
  • the big structure of the sentence would be -- of nations and economies, [but permanent and with far-reaching consequences]?
Please help me out! Thank you in advance. =)
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The Brexit would amount to a figurative divorce between the UK and the EU, and that divorce would be just as permanent as the literal divorce between Henry VIII and his first wife, and it would have far-reaching consequences.
     

    grimbergen

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you so much for the reply, The Newt! I guess it was difficult to understand partly because it is related to the history.

    I just have one more question. Can anyone please explain to me if there is any difference between "divorce from" and "divorce of"?
    I guess in the context, "nations and ecomomies" means other EU members, so I just wonder why "of" is used instead of "from," which I am familiar with when it comes to the preposition after "divorce."
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Thank you so much for the reply, The Newt! I guess it was difficult to understand partly because it is related to the history.

    I just have one more question. Can anyone please explain to me if there is any difference between "divorce from" and "divorce of"?
    I guess in the context, "nations and ecomomies" means other EU members, so I just wonder why "of" is used instead of "from," which I am familiar with when it comes to the preposition after "divorce."
    One party in a divorce obtains a divorce from the other (Mary got a divorce from Larry), but the divorce itself is a divorce of the two parties (the divorce of Mary and Larry).
     

    grimbergen

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, The Newt! I did not know about the differences!

    In this case, "the divorce of nations and economies," though, I guess what the writer meant was not the seperation between "nations" and "economies," right? He meant that "the divorce of nations," the UK separated from other EU nations, and "the divorce of economies," the UK separated from the EU economy.

    Prepositions are so subtle and difficult to understand for ESLs. Thank you again for the explanation, The Newt!
     
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