do a fart

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  • jtLeebs

    Senior Member
    USA
    English - USA
    Tirarse un pedo por aquí es simplemente to fart. I've never heard to do a fart. Un saludo, anointing-revival!
     

    jtLeebs

    Senior Member
    USA
    English - USA
    Wouldn't a child say that when asking his uncle to do that sound with his armpit?

    Hahah...hmm, didn't think of that. I guess a little kid could, why not!

    "Uncle Joe, do a fart."
    "Uncle Joe, make a fart/farting sound."
     

    inib

    Senior Member
    British English
    From the British end, I've never heard "do a fart" either. "Have a fart", at the most, but usually just "fart". Oh, and of course, "to let off a (XXX) fart" (useful if you want to put an adjective where the x's are):(
     

    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    From the British end, I've never heard "do a fart" either. "Have a fart", at the most, but usually just "fart". Oh, and of course, "to let off a (XXX) fart" (useful if you want to put an adjective where the x's are):(

    Even when it's an imitation fart? (armpit, mouth, whopee cushion,...)
     

    gknaddison

    New Member
    English - American
    It depends a bit on the context, I think.

    "You're making a funny face. Are you trying to do a fart?" is not a really natural phrasing, but I can imagine someone saying it that way.

    "I was driving down the road and then my car did a fart. The transmission dropped right out of it." This meaning/usage could be applied to anything going wrong, whether or not there is a smell or a bad sound.
     

    inib

    Senior Member
    British English
    It depends a bit on the context, I think.

    "You're making a funny face. Are you trying to do a fart?" is not a really natural phrasing, but I can imagine someone saying it that way.

    "I was driving down the road and then my car did a fart. The transmission dropped right out of it." This meaning/usage could be applied to anything going wrong, whether or not there is a smell or a bad sound.
    I've never personally heard of "doing a fart" in the sense of "something going wrong" but I can believe it. In fact, that was exactly what I, as a child, thought was happening when our 1960's Volkswagen Beetle used to backfire.:D
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE/Spanish-Mexico
    En la familia de mi esposa dicen que alguien "hizo una pluma". However, in my own family, we grew up saying someone "fluffed" no doubt to avoid saying fart which was considered vulgar and could get your mouth washed out with soap. Times have changed and now farted is as common as burped.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    In addition to the basic verb, to fart, in AmEn we also use the noun with two other verbs:

    to cut a fart
    to let a fart

    The first one led to (or possibly came from) the expression "to cut the cheese" (= to fart, because some cheeses have very strong odors, which are emitted when a fresh wheel of cheese is cut open). We also say "to cut one."

    When I was a child, my mother (like Pops' family) thought "fart" was too vulgar, so she always said "to pass gas," which I believe is the medical term and is still used whenever sensitivity is desired.
     

    Raposu

    Senior Member
    English USA
    Other possibilities are "to let a fart fly," "to let fly a fart," and "to let one fly." Chaucer, in The Miller's Tale, wrote This Nicholas anon let fle a fart, As greet as it had been a thonder-dent."
     

    grindios

    Senior Member
    USA
    English - United States Midwestern
    When I was a child, my mother (like Pops' family) thought "fart" was too vulgar, so she always said "to pass gas," which I believe is the medical term and is still used whenever sensitivity is desired.
    technically it's "flatulence" but I would say the majority aren't familiar with the term, so "pass gas" is commonly used or "break wind"
     

    Raposu

    Senior Member
    English USA
    My mom encouraged my brothers and me to substitute "bart" or even "pook" for "fart," which she apparently considered too vulgar for polite society. Despite this, my academic interests led me to explore cultural and religious taboos in my interdisciplinary classes. My annual lecture on censorship, language and culture, originally delivered to an registered audience of 25-35, grew to require an auditorium in order to to accommodate the ever-growing non-enrolled demand. I explored the language and culture of Shakespeare, Chaucer, and Old French literature (Le chevalier qui fist parler les cons), etc. The single best compliment of my academic career came for a very intelligent but almost painfully quiet young woman who, having never participated in discussions in several of my classes, told me after my presentation that "that was a fucking good lecture today."
     

    Masood

    Senior Member
    British English
    The single best compliment of my academic career came for a very intelligent but almost painfully quiet young woman who, having never participated in discussions in several of my classes, told me after my presentation that "that was a fucking good lecture today."
    I love it when students come out of their shells like that, it makes it all worthwhile.
    I had one student who was painfully shy and withdrawn and, on top of that, she had health issues. Then, in one lesson, I managed to make her smile and laugh. I had tears of joy.
     

    Raposu

    Senior Member
    English USA
    Masood. your reply from a kindred soul (al otru llau del charcu) brightened my day. My degree and most of my teaching has been in genetics (and evolution), but my broader interests (and those of my academic colleagues) have always been deeply rooted in the humanities.
     
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