do fitness

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nurdug51

Senior Member
Germany,German
What do you say in English when somebody tries to stay bodily fit by means of physical training? Is there an expression containing fit / fitness , like:
she does fitness training
she does fitness ?
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Common expressions among ordinary people who take this kind of exercise to keep fit include:
    She trains.
    She goes to the gym.
    She does aerobics (or kick-boxing, or spinning, or other very specific exercise form).

    "She does fitness training" suggests to me that she is doing something in addition to her specific training for whatever sport she specialises in. But I may be imagining this.
    "She does fitness." - No.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Add to the above:

    exercise (verb)
    Lift weights
    Run
    swim
    spar
    etc.

    She is totally into fitness; she does aerobics, runs, swims, and beats the hell out of her husband. You cannot get in much better shape than that.
     

    LeeT911

    Member
    Canadian English/French
    I agree that one cannot "do fitness".

    On a related note, I have also heard the expression "do gym" (the horror!), which I find absurd. But what about "doing weights"? I'm hesitant about this one. I would stick with "lifting weights", but "doing weights" doesn't strike me as completely wrong, even if I don't say it.

    What are other people's opinion on this?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I agree that one cannot "do fitness".

    On a related note, I have also heard the expression "do gym" (the horror!), which I find absurd. But what about "doing weights"? I'm hesitant about this one. I would stick with "lifting weights", but "doing weights" doesn't strike me as completely wrong, even if I don't say it.

    What are other people's opinion on this?
    Lift weights:tick:
    Power lifting:tick:
    Body building:tick:
    weight lifting:tick:
    resistance training:tick:
    doing weights:cross:


    I lifted weights since I was 13 years old, some 45 years, and I have never heard anyone "doing weights".

    I have heard people:

    go to the gym
    go to the weight room
     

    coiffe

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    Lift weights:tick:
    Power lifting:tick:
    Body building:tick:
    weight lifting:tick:
    resistance training:tick:
    doing weights:cross:


    I lifted weights since I was 13 years old, some 45 years, and I have never heard anyone "doing weights".

    I have heard people:

    go to the gym
    go to the weight room
    These days you can colloquially "do" just about anything, but if we're attempting correct teachable English, "do weight-lifting" is a possibility (not do weights). But I think the other suggestions are generally better. "I work out" is my favorite, but it's not specific, obviously.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    I agree that one cannot "do fitness".

    On a related note, I have also heard the expression "do gym" (the horror!), which I find absurd. But what about "doing weights"? I'm hesitant about this one. I would stick with "lifting weights", but "doing weights" doesn't strike me as completely wrong, even if I don't say it.

    What are other people's opinion on this?
    I think "to do gym" means "to do gymnastics", which is fine. I don't think it would be correct to use it to refer to going to the gym.

    Lifting weights is fine, but I think the original post refers to general fitness training rather than specifically weight-lifting, which is why I suggested "keep-fit".
     

    coiffe

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    I think "to do gym" means "to do gymnastics", which is fine. I don't think it would be correct to use it to refer to going to the gym.

    Lifting weights is fine, but I think the original post refers to general fitness training rather than specifically weight-lifting, which is why I suggested "keep-fit".
    I agree with you, but why do you hyphenate "keep-fit"?
     

    JeffJo

    Senior Member
    USA
    USA, English
    Don't say "she does fitness training" merely to mean that she exercises. There is an occupation called "fitness trainer." A person who does "fitness training" will be a professional fitness teacher.

    Since fitness training is an occupation, this is one of those odd cases where, if there were only the two choices originally mentioned, it would be preferable to say "she does fitness," in order to avoid being misleading.

    When no particular exercise is mentioned, the phrase I hear most often is probably, "she keeps in shape."
     

    coiffe

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    I'm not sure, I think that as a noun it's hyphenated; "I do keep-fit".
    As a verb it wouldn't have the hyphen; "I keep fit".
    Interesting. I've never heard "I do keep-fit," but it sounds as though that's common over there.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I'm not sure, I think that as a noun it's hyphenated; "I do keep-fit".
    As a verb it wouldn't have the hyphen; "I keep fit".
    If "keep-fit" is a noun, then I would hyphenate it.

    Say that "keep-fit" was a proprietary excercise program by the Queen Elizabeth Fitness Club, and you like taking the "keep-fit" classes at that club, then you might say, "I do keep-fit".
     
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