do / make an update of

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Thomas1

Senior Member
polszczyzna warszawska
Hello,

I'd like to know if I understand the difference between 'do an update' and 'make an update' of software.

I did an update of the software on my computer. [For instance I downloaded the update and installed it.]

Being no software developer there is little chance I can make an update of my software, but I can do an update of it if someone makes it for me. [For instance, I can't create new improvements for the software on my computer, but I can download an update for it and install it if someone else creates such improvements for me.]

If the examples above are wrong, please could you please correct them or provide me with some correct and natural-sounding samples?


Thank you,
T
 
  • Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    Hello,

    I'd like to know if I understand the difference between 'do an update' and 'make an update' of software.

    I did an update of the software on my computer. [For instance I downloaded the update and installed it.]

    Being no software developer there is little chance I can make an update of my software, but I can do an update of it if someone makes it for me. [For instance, I can't create new improvements for the software on my computer, but I can download an update for it and install it if someone else creates such improvements for me.]

    If the examples above are wrong, please could you please correct them or provide me with some correct and natural-sounding samples?


    Thank you,
    T
    Maybe a computer expert will take a different view, but I suggest you use the verb 'to update', and then you don't need either 'do' or 'make': "I updated the software...", "... I can update it if ...".
     

    Walhaz

    Member
    English - England
    "Do" is more natural. "Make" generally means "create" (it's a mistake I often hear in Spain where hacer can be both do and make). In your example "make" isn't appropriate.

    Being no software developer, there is little chance I can do an update of my software, but I can do an update of it if someone does it for me.

    But also "update" can be a verb too, and the following is even more natural for me:

    Being no software developer, there is little chance I can update my software, but I can update it if someone does it for me.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    "Do" is more natural. "Make" generally means "create" (it's a mistake I often hear in Spain where hacer can be both do and make). In your example "make" isn't appropriate.

    Being no software developer, there is little chance I can do an update of my software, but I can do an update of it if someone does it for me.

    But also "update" can be a verb too, and the following is even more natural for me:

    [...]
    Thank you, this is what I was looking for.

    A follow-up question:
    why does 'make' not work in this sentence if I mean to create an update?
    I have seen it used in sentences like:

    Later in 2009, Microsoft made an update available that would make the same changes to autoplay for Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008.
    http://www.pcworld.com/article/2191...ffers_an_easier_way_to_turn_off_autoruns.html

    What does it mean in this sentence?


    EDIT: that is not a good example. :eek:
     
    Last edited:

    Walhaz

    Member
    English - England
    why does 'make' not work in this sentence if I mean to create an update?
    I don't know much about computer industry vocab, but I imagine "design" might be more appropriate than "make". I'm not sure what would be better in this sense, although I think it would be understood by most people.

    "Microsoft made an update available"
    "to make available" means "to allow/give access to". In the example Microsoft has put an update "on the market" to allow public access to it.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I don't know much about computer industry vocab, but I imagine "design" might be more appropriate than "make". I'm not sure what would be better in this sense, although I think it would be understood by most people.
    Your answer prompts me, however, that 'make an update' is not the choice of words a native English speaker would make.

    "Microsoft made an update available"
    "to make available" means "to allow/give access to". In the example Microsoft has put an update "on the market" to allow public access to it.
    This is not the best example, sorry. :eek: I should have been more attentive. Here are some other ones:
    We’ve just made an update to eSpatial, in line with our policy of continuously developing our product. The changes we’ve implemented will enhance your experience of using our software.
    https://www.espatial.com/articles/new-update-to-espatial

    In May 2010, Sprint made an update to Android 2.1 (Eclair) available on its website,[4] then announced in June via Twitter that the Moment and HTC Hero would not be upgraded to Android 2.2 (Froyo).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samsung_SPH-M900

    Could it be used by specialists? I've also noticed that it's 'make an update to'. Does it change anything?

    I'm not deliberately argumentative. I'm trying to understand how 'make an update' works.
     
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