do / make

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sunsail

Senior Member
de langue Turc
Hello

As far as I know I should use "make" when I create/construct something and "do" when I talk about usual daily activities.

In an interview If I say

I did business analyst work, (this is part of my job,usual activity)
I did java programming (this is part of my job,usual activity)
I made reporting (this is usual activity however every report was created from scratch)

Which one should I use?

if you have alternatives I d like to hear your suggestions

Thanks
 
  • teksch

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Hello

    As far as I know I should use "make" when I create/construct something and "do" when I talk about usual daily activities.

    In an interview If I say

    I did business analyst work, (this is part of my job,usual activity)
    I did java programming (this is part of my job,usual activity)
    I made reporting (this is usual activity however every report was created from scratch)

    Which one should I use?

    if you have alternatives I d like to hear your suggestions

    Thanks
    Did and made are rather awkward choices here. While “I did business analyst work” and “I did java programming” may be correct, “I made reporting” is incorrect. To figure out why this is incorrect, look at “made” and “reporting” in terms of their time elements.

    I did business analyst work – I was involved in business analyst – I was a business analyst.

    I did java programming – I did programming in java – I was a java programmer.

    I made reporting – I created reports – I wrote reports – I programmed the software to create reports, etc.
     

    sunsail

    Senior Member
    de langue Turc
    Can you explain this part?

    To figure out why this is incorrect, look at “made” and “reporting” in terms of their time elements.

    Actually I was thinkin of " I did reporting" but as I said each report was unique creation.

    Thanks

    Did and made are rather awkward choices here. While “I did business analyst work” and “I did java programming” may be correct, “I made reporting” is incorrect. To figure out why this is incorrect, look at “made” and “reporting” in terms of their time elements.

    I did business analyst work – I was involved in business analyst – I was a business analyst.

    I did java programming – I did programming in java – I was a java programmer.

    I made reporting – I created reports – I wrote reports – I programmed the software to create reports, etc.
     

    Au101

    Senior Member
    England, English (UK)
    Hi, to be honest, it is quite unusual to use these constructions. Whilst I believe the first two are correct, they do sound very awkward to my ear. As Teksch has pointed out, when referring to your occupation, you wouldn't usually say "I did [job]", you would normally say "I was a [job title]".

    The verb "to do" is actually quite a difficult verb, especially as many languages use the same verb for "to do" and "to make". However, it is quite uncommon for people to say "I do [activity]", for example:

    "What are you going to do tomorrow?"
    "I am going to go to the shops", or "I am going shopping", not "I am going to do shopping."

    Of course, there is an old saying, commonly quoted with regards to English grammar which is "it's the exception that proves the rule" and I'm sure there are many exceptions to this piece of advice too. With using the verb "to do" I would just advise plenty of practice and you'll soon learn where it sounds right and where it doesn't.
     

    sunsail

    Senior Member
    de langue Turc
    I never say I do shopping.This is very well known.I am asking something specific related to IT field.
    You are given some tasks which are written in job description.And you are explaining what you do normally.
    You can say I am business analyst.This is not enough.In details you have to tell what you "do".
    I think this is also valid for other specific jobs.Sales person for example
    Thanks


    Hi, to be honest, it is quite unusual to use these constructions. Whilst I believe the first two are correct, they do sound very awkward to my ear. As Teksch has pointed out, when referring to your occupation, you wouldn't usually say "I did [job]", you would normally say "I was a [job title]".

    The verb "to do" is actually quite a difficult verb, especially as many languages use the same verb for "to do" and "to make". However, it is quite uncommon for people to say "I do [activity]", for example:

    "What are you going to do tomorrow?"
    "I am going to go to the shops", or "I am going shopping", not "I am going to do shopping."

    Of course, there is an old saying, commonly quoted with regards to English grammar which is "it's the exception that proves the rule" and I'm sure there are many exceptions to this piece of advice too. With using the verb "to do" I would just advise plenty of practice and you'll soon learn where it sounds right and where it doesn't.
     

    jdotjdot89

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think the issue here is stylistically you're just better off avoiding 'do' and 'make' entirely. While 'I did programming' is technically grammatically correct, it just sounds awkward. What you're looking for generally is more the past tense: 'I programmed in Java'; 'I created reports'. The 'did' is unnecessary and only relevant when you are discussing something that cannot be used as a verb, and even then, you're better off finding a synonym. 'I performed complex systems analyses' rathern than 'I did complex systems analyses.'

    Also, the other poster was just trying to help.
     

    Au101

    Senior Member
    England, English (UK)
    I never say I do shopping.This is very well known.I am asking something specific related to IT field.
    You are given some tasks which are written in job description.And you are explaining what you do normally.
    You can say I am business analyst.This is not enough.In details you have to tell what you "do".
    I think this is also valid for other specific jobs.Sales person for example
    Thanks
    Oh, ok, I see what you mean, and yes I can understand why you want to say "I did..." in fact I'm sure many people would say that, but it sounds very awkward to me and I would probably paraphrase. For example:

    I was a business analyser, or I did some business analysis, or I did some business analysing, or even, I did the work of a business analyser.

    I did some java programming, I was a java programmer, etc.

    I was a reporter, I did some reporting, etc.

    My appologies, I realise that I'm probably actually being quite confusing here, I'm just trying to construct more natural and idiomatic sentences. From a personal point of view, "I did [activity]" just doesn't sound right, and this may just be me. I think your sentences may be grammatical, but I would prefer "I did some [activity]". The reason for this is that if you want to say, as I think you do, I did some of this and some of that and then some of the other, you should say just that and use the word some to indicate that it was just a section of your overall role. If you want to say that something was your role, you should say "I was a [role]". Others may disagree with me here, but this is just what sounds right to my ear. If it were me, I would definitely say, here, "I did some reporting", in answer to your question.

    Edited to add: I also agree with Jdot here, a paraphrase similar to the ones he, or she, has suggested should also work well.
     

    teksch

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I never say I do shopping.This is very well known.I am asking something specific related to IT field.
    You are given some tasks which are written in job description.And you are explaining what you do normally.
    You can say I am business analyst.This is not enough.In details you have to tell what you "do".
    I think this is also valid for other specific jobs.Sales person for example
    Thanks
    Let’s center in on the main problem in “I made reporting”. As a rule in English when a word has an ing ending it is indicative of an ongoing activity – swimming, running, talking, etc.

    To write “I made reporting”, to me, indicates that you “made” (past) something called “reporting”. One could write a sentence this way, “I made reporting a fun activity by being on the beach” – more information was give about reporting.

    What you did was: create, write, originate, draft, polish, or, maybe, print a report. The report is the material that you can touch; the reporting is the act of describing events, or data, or anything else of importance.
     
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