do not procrastinate in any way

miriam91

Senior Member
Slovak
Hello,
I am writing an instruction manual about how to manage Christmas preparations without stress - it should be written formally, but should turn out a bit funny. I would like to use this sentence:

2. For best results, do not procrastinate in any way.


Does the marked part make sense? And the sentence in general?

Thank you.
 
  • paul f

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In my opinion, your use of 'in any way' works well here and the sentence makes perfect sense in general.

    Taking on board what you have said about the style and context, the 'For best results' does work, as long as you are aware that it sounds a little like instructions for cooking a meal rather than for a list such as this. It does not sound particularly wrong at all, maybe a little odd on its own in my opinion but I'm sure as part of the rest of the instructions this will not be a problem.
     

    miriam91

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    I thought it would be clear that For best results refers to accomplishing the tasks before Christmas...And it is a frequent phrase in manuals.
     

    Uncle Bob

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't think it's wrong but "in any way" doesn't seem to add any meaning and it sounds a bit weedy after a nice pompous "procrastinate".
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    For me for best result would be found in such instructions as: Soak the blouse in water with vinegar for one minute after dying, for best results. Or, for best results soak the blouse etc.
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Neither of your clauses works for me, Miriam. "Procrastination" is such a general term that it seems illogical to qualify it by "in any way."
     

    miriam91

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    What if I just dropped in any way and wrote: For best results, do not procrastinate.

    I would like to use for best results even if it is quite unusual in this context.
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    Yes, I agree with you Cyberpedant. Procrastination is not even that often used in AE. It sounds like a phrase from a boarding school, or some formal religious teaching.
     

    paul f

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To procrastinate is certainly in common usage in BE.

    My suggestion should you wish to avoid its use however would be:

    '(In order to stay as stree-free as possible,) don't leave everything until the last minute'
     
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