Do what is right, no matter who it hurts

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

I already know that the phrase "do what is right, no matter who it hurts" (meaning: always do the right thing, regardless of personal interests, etc) is natural/correct. My question: Is it natural/correct to use "do what is right, no matter who it hurts" + "even oneself" in the example that I created below?

a. [A father telling his son]: We always have to do what is right, no matter who it hurts, even ourselves.
b. [A politician trying to convince people to vote for him]: You have to do what is right, not matter who it hurts, even yourself.

Meaning: Everyone should do what is morally right (not hide the truth, not protect corrupt people, etc), even when it affects yourself, your friends, etc.

Thank you in advance!
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Edit: what is your source? We usually ask where you saw this quote.

    I have not heard this phrase, so I don't know "when it is natural to use it". In politics both sides usually think their view is "what is right". So the issue is "what is right?", not choosing to do or not do what is right.

    And "who gets hurt" is very often part of deciding "what is right". So this quote ("do what is right no matter who gets hurt") sounds old-fashioned or foreign to me.
     
    Last edited:

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Is there a way (phrase) to express this in natural English
    The sentence is fine. It expresses the meaning well. I misunderstood your first sentence:

    I already know that the phrase "do what is right, no matter who it hurts" (meaning: always do the right thing, regardless of personal interests, etc) is natural/correct.
    I thought you meant "I know that this is a standard phrase in English". Instead you meant "I know this sentence is correct."
     
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