Do with their death bury their parents' strife

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Vishinka

Senior Member
Hebrew
<< Topic sentence: Do with their death bury their parents' strife. >>

Hello everybody.
Would anyone be kind and explain to me please what did Shakespeare mean when he wrote it in Romeo & Juliet?
What does "do with" mean here? Is this a common English?
I know the rule ask to provide some more details, but I'm pretty sure that everybody familiar with this text.
Thank you!
 
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  • Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    “Doth, with their death, bury their parents strife.” – the punctuation is important - means “Do, as a result of them (Romeo and Juliet) dying, bring an end to their parents’ troubles”
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    >>I'm pretty sure that everybody familiar with this text.<<

    I'm pretty sure a lot of people aren't at all familiar with the text and would be interested in seeing you provide a couple of complete sentences to provide context, and also something to the effect that your query is about a line from the Prologue to "Romeo and Juliet". These are forum rules after all.
     

    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    The prologue is missing in the first folio of 1623, but is included in the second quarto of 1599, where the lines 8-11 read as follows (original spelling retained):

    From forth the fatall loynes of these two foes,
    A paire of starre-crost louers, take their life:
    Whose misaduentur’d pittious ouerthrowes,
    Doth with their death burie their Parents strife.

    NB: no punctuation in line 11.
     
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    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    I do not see how "pair" can possibly be the subject of "doth". What do you make of "whose .... overthrows" ? I see that in many modern (non-scholarly) editions of RJ "doth" has tacitly been emended to "do". A printer's error in the original is not out of the question.
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    I believe "whose misadventured* piteous overthrows" is an adjectivalclause (in parenthesis) describing the pair. “ The pair, whose xxxxxx, do (doth)..... “

    *I've read in some notes on the text (I can't find the link at the moment) where it is suggested that it should read "whose misadventures, piteous
    overthrows"
     
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