Do you fancy…?

MaRi__aNnA

Member
Ukrainian
Hello 👋,Native speakers, could you tell me do you often use the word “fancy” ? For example: Do you fancy going out for a meal after work? Or maybe there are more popular synonyms?
 
  • Wordy McWordface

    Senior Member
    SSBE (Standard Southern British English)
    Hello and welcome. For me, as a British English speaker, that's a very natural thing to say. It's an informal way of asking whether the idea appeals to the other person. I use the expression a lot.
     
    Last edited:

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Hello and welcome. For me, as a British English speaker, that's very natural thing to say. It's an informal way of asking whether the idea appeals to the other person. I use the expression a lot.
    Yes. All of this.

    Also, standing in front of something that requires a choice, such as a buffet, menu, shop counter:
    What do you fancy?”
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    Hello 👋,Native speakers, could you tell me do you often use the word “fancy” ? For example: Do you fancy going out for a meal after work? Or maybe there are more popular synonyms?
    As an American English speaker, I never use 'fancy' as a verb, and I imagine that the same is true of most AmE speakers.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    In BrE, because it is informal, instead of 'Do you fancy going out for a meal after work?' might become 'Fancy a bite after work?' (a shortened sentence; and 'meal' sounds a bit formal so I've used another word).
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    But it's derived from the imperative form, isn't it? Fancy that! Imagine that!

    And fancy to mean imagine rather than like is also non-AmE?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    He fancies himself as a connoiseur of fine things.
    She fancied that he was embarrassed.
    I fancy it will rain later.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Not to my knowledge. In fact, I don’t think I would have even understood the second and third examples :eek: (I think I’ve come across the reflexive use, as in the first example, in British English).
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    What do Americans say when they “fancy someone” in terms of being a potential date?
    Eg
    “I fancy her, but I daren’t ask her out”
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    It’s a verb etymologically. Synchronically, “Fancy that!” is an interjection.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    So what? Anything can be an interjection. This particular one happens to consist of the imperative form of a transitive verb, complete with its direct object.

    Not all dictionaries even bother listing it as an interjection. Dictionary.com gives the following as one of the definitions of "fancy" as a verb:
    to form a conception of; picture to oneself: Fancy living with that egotist all your life!
     
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