Do you get the draft [drift]

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by periquin70, Jul 3, 2012.

  1. periquin70 Member

    Murcia (Spain)
    Spanish from Spain
    I have heard on the radio a colloquial expression (do you get the draft?) to say more or less : do you Know What I mean? but I'm not sure whether I understood right. Any suggestions? Thanks
     
  2. gotitadeleche Senior Member

    Texas, U.S.A.
    U.S.A. English
    The expression is "Do you get the drift?"

    According to WordReference:

    drift
    ▶noun
    • 2 the general meaning of someone's remarks: he didn't understand much Greek, but he got her drift.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 3, 2012
  3. Masood

    Masood Senior Member

    Leicester, England
    British English
    I agree with the above - 'drift', not 'draft'.
     
  4. aldonzalorenzo

    aldonzalorenzo Senior Member

    castellano de España
    Why her drift? Shouldn't it be its drift?
     
  5. gotitadeleche Senior Member

    Texas, U.S.A.
    U.S.A. English
    She (whoever she is) must have been speaking Greek. He didn't understand much Greek, but was able to get a rough idea of what she was talking about.

    Her drift = her meaning.
     
  6. Lis48

    Lis48 Senior Member

    York, England
    English - British
    Her drift because it´s the drift of her words.
    But you could say "The conversation was all in Greek. I didn´t understand its (the conversation´s) drift."
     
  7. aldonzalorenzo

    aldonzalorenzo Senior Member

    castellano de España
    Ok, thanks, gotita. I thought drift refered to Greek, not to the one talking.
    And thanks, Lis.
    I still don't know if I'll be able to use 'drift' :).
     
  8. Lis48

    Lis48 Senior Member

    York, England
    English - British
    It´s commonly used to mean the general sense of something.
    For example if I don´t understand what you mean in one of your posts I could write:
    "Sorry aldonzalorenzo. I don´t get your drift. Can you explain it better please?" ( i.e. I don´t understand where you are drifting/going).

    Or I am at a bus stop and don´t really hear what the other women are saying but I catch the general drift that the buses are on strike again so won´t be coming.

    Or my mother in law phoones and starts to tell me all about the neighbours, I say "Sorry but I am in a hurry. Can you just give me the drift?"

    Hope you´ll use the word from now on! :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2012
  9. Masood

    Masood Senior Member

    Leicester, England
    British English
    In general terms, get the drift of something...captar lo esencial de algo.
     
  10. periquin70 Member

    Murcia (Spain)
    Spanish from Spain
    Thanks eveyone!!! Like always, very constructive.
     
  11. aldonzalorenzo

    aldonzalorenzo Senior Member

    castellano de España
    Thanks, Lis. Really clear now. I'll do my best :).

    (I didn't know -or perhaps realized- that you were a mod)
     

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