Do you have any children? / Have you any children?

Pitt

Senior Member
German
Hello,

I'd like to know if both sentences are correct:

1) Do you have any children?
2) Have you any children?

Regards
 
  • rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    They're both correct, although (2) is more formal than (1) and you'd be unlikely to say it. Personally I'd say "Have you got any children?"
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    No. Have you got any children? is the long form of the more accurate, Have you any children?.

    The verb to get seems to be inserted for no particular reason.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I understand from previous discussions on similar subjects many American feel uncomfortable with 2).

    In Britain we are happy to use have in the negative and interrogative without do, even when it is not functioning as an auxiliary verb. As rhitagawr says, it can sound a bit formal or old-fashioned.

    The structure I have got is different: it is neither a long form nor a short form of the verb of 1) and 2).
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    No. Have you got any children? is the long form of the more accurate, Have you any children?.

    The verb to get seems to be inserted for no particular reason.
    I disagree. Opinions on this will differ but I don't regard the 'got' form as 'the long form' and I don't regard the shorter form as more accurate. The 'got' form is more colloquial, however; I'd write the shorter form. To me, the short for sounds a little too correct in speech and the 'got' form sounds a little more natural. The verb 'to get' isn't 'inserted'; it's always been there.
     

    roserose

    Member
    Russian
    Hello,

    Can you say that the third question below is incorrect?

    1. Have you got any children?
    2. Do you have any chidlren?
    3. Have you any children?

    According to the grammar books "it's rare", but my students always make this mistake and I wonder how bad it is, I mean, should I correct it or does it sound OK to the native speaker?

    Thanks
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    <Mod note: roserose's thread (from post 11) has been merged with an earlier thread. Nat>

    Roserose, please look at the earlier responses as well as the other threads mentioned by cycloneviv (post 8).
     

    Thomas320d

    New Member
    German Germany
    Hello from Germany,

    As a teacher I'm always asked the question:
    Are the following quesitions correct in English:

    1. Have you children?
    2. Have you any children?
    3. Have you got any children?
    4. Do you have children?
    5. Do you have any children?
    Imho No. 3 and 5 should be right.
    But students keep on asking if the others are corrext, too.
    They are very similar to the German (Hast du Kinder?), esp. No. 1.
    Please can anybody tell me here, if No.1, 2, 4 are grammatically correct?
    The main proble is the usage of any and/or got
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    A good example of how, coming from German, you should avoid the German phrasing (though it is correct), and emphasize the most characteristic English orders: 3 and 5. I wouldn't say 1 would be used at all, though I can't say why it is less acceptable than 4. ('Have you got children?' is of equal acceptability with 4.)

    'Have you' is mainly BrE and may come across as rather old-fashioned. 'Have you got' is generally more natural. 'Any' doesn't really add anything to the meaning, but is likely to be used.
     

    PureLand

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    1. Have you children?
    2. Have you any children?
    3. Have you got any children?
    4. Do you have children?
    5. Do you have any children?

    A good example of how, coming from German, you should avoid the German phrasing (though it is correct), and emphasize the most characteristic English orders: 3 and 5. I wouldn't say 1 would be used at all, though I can't say why it is less acceptable than 4. ('Have you got children?' is of equal acceptability with 4.)

    'Have you' is mainly BrE and may come across as rather old-fashioned. 'Have you got' is generally more natural. 'Any' doesn't really add anything to the meaning, but is likely to be used.

    I am really confused about the following :confused: Thank you :)

    Do you have children? Which of the following is/are correct?
    1. Yes, I do. I do have children. ("do" is used FOR EMPHASIS.)
    2. Yes, I do. I have children. ("do" is used TO AVOID REPEATING.)
    3. Yes, I have. I have got children. ("have" is an auxiliary.)
    4. Yes, I have. I have (got) children. ("have" is an auxiliary, and"got" can be omitted.)
    5. Yes, I have. I have children. ("have" is a main verb.)
     
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    PureLand

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It must be confusing. Every example you give is correct. Some are more used than others.
    These are all correct. But why not use a simple ”Yes”?

    Thank you your answers, Hermione Golightly and Se16teddy :D

    Perhaps I should have asked this way :confused:

    Do you have children?

    1. Yes, I do. (Is "do" used FOR EMPHASIS or TO AVOID REPEATING? Thank you :)

    2. Yes, I have. (Is "have" used as an auxiliary or a main verb? Thank you :)
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Thank you your answers, Hermione Golightly and Se16teddy :D

    Perhaps I should have asked this way :confused:

    Do you have children?

    1. Yes, I do. (Is "do" used FOR EMPHASIS or TO AVOID REPEATING? Thank you :)

    2. Yes, I have. (Is "have" used as an auxiliary or a main verb? Thank you :)
    In practice most people wouldn't answer the question in that way. A much more common response in my experience would be something like "Yes, a boy and a girl" or "Two sons" etc.

    Just saying "Yes I do/have" would imply to me that you thought the person asking the question was being nosey and wanted to avoid answering it.
     

    PureLand

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In practice most people wouldn't answer the question in that way. A much more common response in my experience would be something like "Yes, a boy and a girl" or "Two sons" etc.

    Just saying "Yes I do/have" would imply to me that you thought the person asking the question was being nosey and wanted to avoid answering it.

    I see! Thanks so much for this useful information, DonnyB :D

    But what if I do wish to avoid answering the question .... :p (for personal reasons)

    Do you have children?

    1. Yes, I do. (Is "do" used FOR EMPHASIS or TO AVOID REPEATING? :confused: Thank you :)

    2. Yes, I have. (Is "have" used as an auxiliary or a main verb? :confused: Thank you :)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    In general:

    Do you have ... ?
    >> Yes I do.

    Have you (got) ... ?
    >> Yes I have
     

    PureLand

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In general:

    Do you have ... ?
    >> Yes I do.
    Have you (got) ... ?
    >> Yes I have
    Oh, that's right! Thank you so much, Loob :D

    Pride and Prejudice (2005)
    Mr. Darcy: No, believe me, I didn't mean--
    Elizabeth Bennet: If I was uncivil, then that is some excuse. But I have other reasons, you know I have.
    Mr. Darcy: What reasons?

    Is "I have" a short form of "I have (got)..."? Thank you :) Or I would be really confused :confused:
     
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    PureLand

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    #10
    I disagree. Opinions on this will differ but I don't regard the 'got' form as 'the long form' and I don't regard the shorter form as more accurate. The 'got' form is more colloquial, however; I'd write the shorter form. To me, the short for sounds a little too correct in speech and the 'got' form sounds a little more natural. The verb 'to get' isn't 'inserted'; it's always been there.
    I'd say not. Look at #10 in this thread, Pure Land.
    I see! Thanks so much for your response, Thomas Tompion! :D

    "But I have other reasons, you know I have." :confused: (Is 'have" here a main verb or an auxiliary?) Thank you :)

    I have ruled out two possibilities here:
    Do you have other reasons? Yes, I do.
    Have you got other reasons? Yes, I have.

    So is it "Have you other reasons? Yes, I have" :confused: Thank you :)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    In her Pride and Prejudice, Austen seems to be making the distinction between "have" and "have got". For example, when her characters say "I have got some news", it can be read as "I have obtained some news".

    But "I have (possess) other reasons".
     

    PureLand

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In her Pride and Prejudice, Austen seems to be making the distinction between "have" and "have got". For example, when her characters say "I have got some news", it can be read as "I have obtained some news".

    But "I have (possess) other reasons".
    it's a main verb.

    So is "am" in
    "Are you happy?"
    "You know I am".
    Thank you so much for your explanations, Velisarius and Loob :D

    But as you said earlier,
    In general:
    Do you have ... ?
    >> Yes I do.
    Have you (got) ... ?
    >> Yes I have

    But I have other reasons, you know I have. = ... you know I have (possess) other reasons...

    Is this a SPECIAL case of "ellipsis"? :confused: Thank you :)

    If NOT, applying the same logic mentioned, when people ask me
    1. "Do you have reasons for that", I can answer "Yes, I have," instead of saying, "Yes, I do".
    2. "Do you like English", I can answer "Yes, I like," instead of saying, "Yes, I do".
    3. "Do you enjoy reading, I can answer "Yes, I enjoy," instead of saying, "Yes, I do".
    and so on.

    This contradicts everything I have learned at school :confused:
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    1. "Do you have reasons for that", I can answer "Yes, I have," instead of saying, "Yes, I do". :tick:
    2. "Do you like English", I can answer "Yes, I like," instead of saying, "Yes, I do". :cross:
    3. "Do you enjoy reading, I can answer "Yes, I enjoy," instead of saying, "Yes, I do". :cross:
    In (1) you have the choice. Your answer can echo either the auxiliary verb "do" or the main verb "have" from the question.
    But unfortunately this doesn't work in (2) and (3). Here you must use "do", unless you also provide an explicit object, for example "Yes, I like/enjoy it very much."
    I don't know why it's permissible (indeed mandatory) to omit the object when the main verb is "have", but it is. It may be related to the fact that this is what you would do when "have" acts as an auxiliary.
     

    PureLand

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In (1) you have the choice. Your answer can echo either the auxiliary verb "do" or the main verb "have" from the question.
    But unfortunately this doesn't work in (2) and (3). Here you must use "do", unless you also provide an explicit object, for example "Yes, I like/enjoy it very much."
    I don't know why it:idea:'s permissible (indeed mandatory) to omit the object when the main verb is "have", but it is. It may be related to the fact that this is what you would do when "have" acts as an auxiliary.
    Thank you sooooooo much for your explanation, Edinburgher! I got it! :idea: I am ecstatic. Thank you :D

    And thank you all for helping me with my questions, Hermione Golightly, Se16teddy, DonnyB, Loob, Thomas Tompion, Velisarius, and Edinburgher :D
     

    PureLand

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I have a friend who habitually uses "Have you a ...?" in informal situations. I've heard others from his part of the UK do it too. His area is a "relict area" in this respect.
    Some traditional rules no longer hold... :eek: Thank you Sound Shift :D
     
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