Do you know, who has done this? / Do you know who done this has?

dumbfounded

Senior Member
persian
Like in asking questions we change order. For example..
Do you know, where John is? Here we don't use "where is john" but we take "is" to end. What about in this sentence?
Do you know, who has done this? I know this is right but as in order it should be , Do you know, who done this has?
I know it sounds wrong.
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hello dumbfounded

    It's not the case that we 'take the verb to the end' in indirect questions; instead, what we do is use subject-verb word order.

    So "Do you know, who done this has?" is wrong:(.

    Instead, you want "Do you know who has done this?"
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In the second instance the verb has a direct object.

    If you wanted to know where John hid the case, you'd say Do you know where John hid the case?

    If you wanted to know where John hid, you'd say Do you know where John hid?

    The verb is at the end in the first sentence because the verb has no direct object.

    Cross-posted with Loob.
     

    elprofe

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    If I were you, I wouldn't worry too much about the grammar rule behind that, as you definitely know how to say it correctly.

    From the point of view of grammar, it goes like this:
    Normal questions (object questions)
    Where did he see that film? ---> Do you know where he saw that film?
    We use an auxiliary verb in the first question, but we don't use it in the second question as that part of the sentence is not a real question. Therefore, we form the second part of the question as if it were an affirmative sentence.

    Questions with the verb "to be"

    Where is the cinema? ---> Do you know where the cinema is?
    The verb "to be" doesn't take auxiliary verbs in questions, so we change the word order when asking a question with the verb "to be". In the second question, the verb "to be" is placed after the subject (as in an affirmative statement) because the real question is "do you know..." not, "where is the cinema".

    Subject questions
    Who did that? ---> Do you know who did that?
    We don't use auxiliary verbs when asking about the grammar subject, so this type of question is constructed the same way an affirmative sentence is: John did that / Who did that? (you can tell that the order of the elements is the same in both cases).
    As we have seen before, the second parts of the second questions are constructed as though they were affirmative sentences (Do you know where he saw the film? ; Do you know where the cinema is?). Thus, we use the same order both in subject questions and in questions starting with "do you know...", which is why you don't need to change anything when turning: "who has done it?" into "do you know who has done it?".

    I hope it helps :)
     
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