Do you plan/are you planning

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KonradBade

Senior Member
German
Hey,

I want to ask a friend if he will be at a party tomorrow night.

Do I ask:

Do you plan on coming to the party tomorrow night?
or
Are you planning on coming to the party tomorrow night?


are both versions correct? I would prefer the first one, but I can't tell you why... I can't find a grammar rule...

may it's better just to say:

Do you come to the party?
Are you coming to the party?


Hope you can help me! :)
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Both your first two versions sound fine, Konrad.

    Your last version also sounds good.

    "Do you come to the party?" doesn't work.
     

    KonradBade

    Senior Member
    German
    Why does it not work? Because "are you coming to the party" is a future form and "do you come to the party" is not?

    Like in: I am flying to spain next year.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Well, "Do you come to the party?" uses the verb "do" in an odd way. "Are you coming to the party?" or "Do you plan on coming to the party?" both sound fine.

    Using "do" in the past would also be good: Did you go to the party?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Not sure if the "grammar" people have agreed on a rule, but this construction seems to occur mainly with repetitions
    "Do you eat meat?"
    "Do you read much fiction?"
    "Do you come here often?"
    "Do you come there in winter for skiing?"
    I'm sure someone has figured out a "class" of verbs where it's OK but it doesn't work for me either in "Do you come to the party tonight?" I seems like there ought to be an English version of the one from your native tongue "Come you to the party tonight?" but there isn't and not all "auxiliary verbs" will work here.

    Maybe also states "Do you want to go tonight?"
     
    Last edited:

    Prower

    Banned
    Russian
    Do you plan on coming to the party tomorrow night?
    or
    Are you planning on coming to the party tomorrow night?
    Could someone explain how these two mean the same while used in different tenses? What is the key element here? If we put another main verb it won't work the same way most of the times I guess.

    Are you going?
    Do you go?

    How come, then, plan works fine with both Simple/Continuous meaning the same?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "Do you eat meat?"
    "Do you read much fiction?"
    "Do you come here often?"
    "Do you come there in winter for skiing?"

    all refer to habitual and continual practice in the past that is supposed to continue to the present.

    "Do you come to the party." only works if you regularly go to the party (which requires a regular party...)

    "Are you coming to the party?" and "He is coming to the party" speaks of one event in the future.


    Do you plan on coming to the party tomorrow night?
    and
    Are you planning on coming to the party tomorrow night?

    are both in the same tense - the present.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It's an unusual use of "plan"!
    The normal use of plan as an action verb (similar, in that sense, to go)would be
    "Do you plan cities for a living? Yes, I'm a city planner."
    But "Do you plan to ...?" has a special meaning "Is it your intention to X?" or "Is it part of your plan that you will X?"
    The simple and continuous are both in : "Is it part of the plan you (are)/(will be) carrying out?" where it=coming to the party?"
     

    Prower

    Banned
    Russian
    But "Do you plan to ...?" has a special meaning "Is it your intention to X?" or "Is it part of your plan that you will X?"
    The simple and continuous are both in : "Is it part of the plan you (are)/(will be) carrying out?" where it=coming to the party?"
    Thanks. The meaning is clear. I just want to find out how or why

    Do you plan on ...... = Are you planning on....

    It seems to me that this is a rare verb which behaves this way.

    I mean that

    I understand doesn't mean I am understaning

    I speak doesn't mean I am speaking

    But

    Do you plan on - means - Are you planning on....

    Do you see my point?
     

    Prower

    Banned
    Russian
    Could you recall any other verbs which would behave in the same way. I mean which would mean basically the same both in the present Simple and Present Continuous?

    What about to warn

    I am warning you = I warn you

    Any other?
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Hi, TT. :)

    I was once forbidden, under pain of death, to use phrases like I am intending/wanting/loving/knowing etc. :D Although I know they are used - I have gained that wisdom since my early school days - I have learnt to at least desist, whenever humanly possible, from using them.

    On the other hand, the difference between I warn you and I am warning you is, to me, one of register, and that applies to all similar cases where the present continuous and the present simple tenses mean the same. The present simple tense is the more formal option. In a formal letter I might write "I look forward to hearing from you". In a letter to some friend I might write "Looking forward to hearing from you", provided that I could put up with the idea of having to use such a terrible cliche. :)
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi Boozer,

    I'm not sure I agree. In many circumstances verbs denoting mental acts can't happily be described with the continuous present. However I can think of cases where it is not out of the question:

    1. Some times where the continuous present indicates repeated action in the present - I am loving being able to go there each week end.

    2. With verbs of intention, as I mentioned earlier - I am intending to go there on Thursday.

    I wouldn't recommend these uses to learners because the general rule you were taught usually applies, but I think there are acceptable exceptions (probably many more than I have indicated here).
     

    mummy1

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    Hi All,
    I've just come across your thread and I wanted to bounce something off the natives.
    The other day I helped one of my teenage students write a letter for homework. The brief was: write a formal letter to a radio station asking for info on an event, etc.
    I had her write:
    "Do you plan on organising any other similar events in the future?"
    Her teacher ran a red line through it and said it was not the correct tense. The teacher is Italian, with, I must admit, an excellent grasp of the English Language, but I was really taken aback. In my mind the sentence was correct - I'm an English teacher myself - and I couldn't understand her reasoning.
    She didn't give any explanation to the young student so I was wondering if there is something I have been missing all these years?!
    Thanks for any replies
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Hi All,
    I've just come across your thread and I wanted to bounce something off the natives.
    The other day I helped one of my teenage students write a letter for homework. The brief was: write a formal letter to a radio station asking for info on an event, etc.
    I had her write:
    "Do you plan on organising any other similar events in the future?"
    Her teacher ran a red line through it and said it was not the correct tense. The teacher is Italian, with, I must admit, an excellent grasp of the English Language, but I was really taken aback. In my mind the sentence was correct - I'm an English teacher myself - and I couldn't understand her reasoning.
    She didn't give any explanation to the young student so I was wondering if there is something I have been missing all these years?!
    Thanks for any replies
    It sounds OK to me: I wouldn't have marked it as incorrect.

    Presumably she would have preferred "Are you planning on... " but I think you can use either in that sentence. :)
     

    mummy1

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    Thanks for your input DonnyB,
    I wanted to avoid the double "ing", so I opted for the other form.
    Poor students.... they have them translating Shakespeare, Yeats and what not here in Italy. They make them write dozens of letters using extremely formal English and then when the youngsters go abroad,they can't even order a sandwich in a cafè!
    Just as well my daughter was raised bilingual, she can teach the teacher!
    Cheerio!
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Poor students, indeed. :) For my part, I would have thought the teacher had a problem with the phrase 'plan on doing something'. Yes, I know, it should be considered legit, but I have never liked it. 'Plan to' is both correct and better-sounding to me.
     

    mummy1

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    Poor students, indeed. :) For my part, I would have thought the teacher had a problem with the phrase 'plan on doing something'. Yes, I know, it should be considered legit, but I have never liked it. 'Plan to' is both correct and better-sounding to me.
     

    mummy1

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    Really? That’s so strange... I would always have chosen “plan on + ing”. Could it be an American influence? My mother lived in the USA for some years and she had used some expressions that were “foreign” to Irish ears when we were growing up. I wonder if our American colleagues have any comments on this.
    The question remains: is it incorrect??
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    The question remains: is it incorrect??
    I apologise if what I said was ambiguous, but...

    "Do you plan on organising any other similar events in the future?"
    ... this is quite correct. I have heard it said many times. I do not like it because, to me, it is an inferior version of 'plan to do'. However, I myself would not have marked it as 'incorrect'. I simply made a guess that the teacher was more uncomfortable with the phrase and less so with the tense. :)

    The tense is also correct although, as I mentioned 7 years ago, I find it more formal than the normal, ordinary present continuous I would use here. (I seem to be repeating DonnyB's words... :oops:) Then, again, in writing formality is far more acceptable, even welcome, so I have no idea why the teacher had a problem with the tense either.
     
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