Do you see him tomorrow?/Are you seeing him tomorrow?

arashgh1987

Senior Member
persian
Hi guys

Is there any difference between these sentences? I don't think so I just want to be sure.

Do you see him tomorrow?
Are you seeing him tomorrow?
Will you see him tomorrow?

Thanks.
 
  • palabattle

    New Member
    Vietnam
    Hi guys

    Is there any difference between these sentences? I don't think so I just want to be sure.

    Do you see him tomorrow?
    Are you seeing him tomorrow?
    Will you see him tomorrow?

    Thanks.
    Hi arashgh1987,

    Do you see him tomorrow?
    -> This means you are asking a person as usual; you aren't sure the person you asked will see him tomorrow or not. Even you don't be serious about his or her thinking. You just curious a little bit about his or her problem.

    Are you seeing him tomorrow?
    -> This means you are asking a person who know exactly what he or she want to do. You just try to make sure that his or her intention will be definitely executed at last.

    Will you see him tomorrow?
    -> This means you are asking a person who are undecided what he want to do. You just asking for his or her last decision. Then even the answer "yes" or "no", it won't hurt you anymore.

    I hope this will be helpful to you!

    Regard
    Palabattle
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Hi arashgh1987,

    Do you see him tomorrow?
    -> This means you are asking a person as usual; you aren't sure the person you asked will see him tomorrow or not. Even you don't be serious about his or her thinking. You just curious a little bit about his or her problem.

    Are you seeing him tomorrow?
    -> This means you are asking a person who know exactly what he or she want to do. You just try to make sure that his or her intention will be definitely executed at last.

    Will you see him tomorrow?
    -> This means you are asking a person who are undecided what he want to do. You just asking for his or her last decision. Then even the answer "yes" or "no", it won't hurt you anymore.

    I hope this will be helpful to you!

    Regard
    Palabattle
    Sorry but I disagree. As Copyright says, all the phrases mean more or less the same. There is no implication of executing intentions or indecision in the sentences as they stand.
     

    FrenglyGirl

    Member
    British English
    "Do you see him tomorrow" just sounds odd to me. I can't think of one sentence where I would use it (instead of using "will you see him tomorrow/are you seeing him tomorrow")

    Any examples of "do you see him tomorrow" in usage?!
     

    arashgh1987

    Senior Member
    persian
    Hi arashgh1987,

    Do you see him tomorrow?
    -> This means you are asking a person as usual; you aren't sure the person you asked will see him tomorrow or not. Even you don't be serious about his or her thinking. You just curious a little bit about his or her problem.

    Are you seeing him tomorrow?
    -> This means you are asking a person who know exactly what he or she want to do. You just try to make sure that his or her intention will be definitely executed at last.

    Will you see him tomorrow?
    -> This means you are asking a person who are undecided what he want to do. You just asking for his or her last decision. Then even the answer "yes" or "no", it won't hurt you anymore.

    I hope this will be helpful to you!

    Regard
    Palabattle
    "Do you see him tomorrow" just sounds odd to me.
    Sorry but I disagree. As Copyright says, all the phrases mean more or less the same. There is no implication of executing intentions or indecision in the sentences as they stand.
    Thank you guys but I'm puzzled :) , Are there any other ideas?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    No other ideas because they all mean the same thing. As for saying "Do you...?"...

    I made a dental appointment.
    Finally... but wait a minute... when? Do you see him tomorrow?


    And dozens of other "Do you..." constructions.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    No other ideas because they all mean the same thing. As for saying "Do you...?"...

    I made a dental appointment.
    Finally... but wait a minute... when? Do you see him tomorrow?

    And dozens of other "Do you..." constructions.
    I agree with FrenglyGirl - even in this context, it still sounds odd to me.
     

    palabattle

    New Member
    Vietnam
    Uhm, I still think they have the same meaning. But in some situations, they sound a little bit different. Maybe people like to use these phrase in different way to express their behavior. I'm not a kind of person who live in countries where English is used as native language. Therefore, I'm not sure why people have to use many phrases with the same meaning.

    Hope that you find your answer yet.

    Regard
    Palabattle
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Perhaps I can suggest this for those who don't find "Do you see him tomorrow?" (or variations of the "Do you..." question) natural: For those those do use it, it means the same thing as the other two.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    These questions are not the same to me.

    Do you see him tomorrow?
    This is a somewhat unusual structure.
    It seems to refer to one of several scheduled meetings you have with him. It's rather like "Do you see him on Fridays?"

    Are you seeing him tomorrow?
    Do you have an arrangement to meet him tomorrow?
    A possible answer, "No, he's busy tomorrow so we are meeting on Tuesday."

    Will you see him tomorrow?
    Is it possible that you might see him tomorrow?
    A possible answer, "Yes, I believe we are both going to the Health and Safety Conference."
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I agree with those for whom these questions have different meanings and emphases.

    I don't agree that Do you see him tomorrow? is at all unusual.

    Do you see him...? is asking most obviously about a habit, or a habitual action. I suppose the problem is that tomorrow is very often an individual day, and so it's not clear how the question can refer to a habit...until one remembers that it's common in BE, at least, for tomorrow to refer not only to the day after today, but often, alternatively, to the day of the week after today. It's Friday today, so Do you see him tomorrow? can easily mean Are you in the habit of seeing him on Saturdays?
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    These questions are not the same to me.

    Do you see him tomorrow?
    This is a somewhat unusual structure.
    It seems to refer to one of several scheduled meetings you have with him. It's rather like "Do you see him on Fridays?"
    Thanks panjandrum! This occured to me too at first, but on second thoughts I decided I was mistaken. Yes, I agree that 'do you...' suggests some sort of regular event, though as you say, the normal context would be 'Do you see him on <day of week>.
     

    arashgh1987

    Senior Member
    persian
    So from what's been discussed here I guess 'Do you see him tomorrow?' is not wrong it's just unusual here , nevertheless 'Present simple' can describe the future for example : I have an upcoming exam. Am I right?
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    So from what's been discussed here I guess 'Do you see him tomorrow?' is not wrong it's just unusual here , nevertheless 'Present simple' can describe the future for example : I have an upcoming exam. Am I right?
    It's really not unusual, Arashgh, in the sense I have explained.

    Certainly Do you see him tomorrow? is asking about the immediate future.

    Do you see him next year? would be unusual, in my view.
     

    Ivan_I

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hi, folks!

    I don’t claim to know English better than natives by any means but I still have some doubts about the ultimate prescription prescribed for this model “Present Simple + tomorrow”. I will try to come up with some valid arguments in an attempt to challenge it (don’t think ill of me if I fail)

    I have read many times in English grammar books about the usage of Present Simple which conveys a fixed event, activity in the future and it is a one-off action (not a regular routine)

    1 He sings in this bar on Saturday. (One time not regularly )

    2 They leave for New York on Monday. They have bought the tickets already.

    The following example was taken from a grammar book (sorry, but I forget the author’s name)

    3 I get up at eight o’clock next Tuesday; I have to be at my lawyer’s. (which is possible to rephrase like - My getting up next Tuesday is scheduled for eight o’clock.)

    (I don’t see why it can’t be – 4 I get up at eight o’clock tomorrow; I have to be at my lawyer’s.)

    Here is one more source

    Future: present simple to talk about the future ( I work tomorrow ) - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary

    Future: present simple to talk about the future (I work tomorrow)

    The present simple is used to refer to events in the future which are certain because they are facts, or because there is a clear or fixed schedule or timetable:



    They give different examples but I am drawn by the one in the parentheses which is (I work tomorrow). I don’t think it tells us about a habitual activity because the name of the section is «Future: present simple to talk about the future»
    ----
    In conclusion, I remain wondering whether it is really so un-idiomatic to use this construction for a scheduled (fixed) activity for the next day (tomorrow) such as “I see my X tomorrow”.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    a scheduled (fixed) activity for the next day (tomorrow) such as “I see my X tomorrow”.
    The idea of a habitual event tomorrow is very Through the Looking-Glass for me. The White Queen tells Alice that she can have jam every other day, but not today. We have "jam to-morrow, jam yesterday - but never jam today." You can't see your doctor today because you see him tomorrow. ;)
     

    Ivan_I

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I find this an odd thing to say, given that several of us have said it's not unidiomatic at all.
    Hello Thomas!
    I might have explained myself badly but you had said that "I see X tomorrow" is only OK when it means that "Someone is in the habit of seeing someone else "tomorrow" where tomorrow will be a certain day of the week.

    But I am talking about a different meaning. (I have provided some examples as well in post 17) I am talking about a planned action which will happen only one time "tomorrow". To me they are two very different meanings. Am I missing something?

    PS: Here is your overview of the issue. You see it as a habitual present (repeated) which means that it is un-idiomatic (in your opinion) to use it for one-off action.
    I agree with those for whom these questions have different meanings and emphases.

    I don't agree that Do you see him tomorrow? is at all unusual.

    Do you see him...? is asking most obviously about a habit, or a habitual action. I suppose the problem is that tomorrow is very often an individual day, and so it's not clear how the question can refer to a habit...until one remembers that it's common in BE, at least, for tomorrow to refer not only to the day after today, but often, alternatively, to the day of the week after today. It's Friday today, so Do you see him tomorrow? can easily mean Are you in the habit of seeing him on Saturdays?
     

    Ivan_I

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The idea of a habitual event tomorrow is very Through the Looking-Glass for me. The White Queen tells Alice that she can have jam every other day, but not today. We have "jam to-morrow, jam yesterday - but never jam today." You can't see your doctor today because you see him tomorrow. ;)
    Hello Myridon!
    The idea of a habitual event tomorrow is clear, because TT explained it well. I am talking about another idea which I explain in post 17. It's about a scheduled event only for one time to happen (tomorrow).
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The idea of a habitual event tomorrow is clear, because TT explained it well.
    TT said it wass not immediately clear until he remembered take into account some BrE usage that "tomorrow" could mean "all Saturdays" instead of "the day after today."

    If you can extend the meaning of "tomorrow" to "all Saturdays", I don't see why it couldn't also be used to mean "all fourth Saturdays of the month", "all February 24ths", ... as those are as much "tomorrow" as "Saturday" is.
     

    Ivan_I

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thank you Maridon! What I see TT said is "It's Friday today, so Do you see him tomorrow? can easily mean Are you in the habit of seeing him on Saturdays?" He chose Saturday because he said that there was a Friday today (that day). But Friday was chosen randomly.

    Well, anyway, I am asking about a different usage.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hello Thomas!
    I might have explained myself badly but you had said that "I see X tomorrow" is only OK when it means that "Someone is in the habit of seeing someone else "tomorrow" where tomorrow will be a certain day of the week.

    But I am talking about a different meaning. (I have provided some examples as well in post 17) I am talking about a planned action which will happen only one time "tomorrow". To me they are two very different meanings. Am I missing something?

    PS: Here is your overview of the issue. You see it as a habitual present (repeated) which means that it is un-idiomatic (in your opinion) to use it for one-off action.
    I think it would be a little strange, for a one-off action, where, for me, I am seeing him tomorrow would be much more usual.
     

    Ivan_I

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I think it would be a little strange, for a one-off action, where, for me, I am seeing him tomorrow would be much more usual.
    I know that TT, that's why I rekindled this discussion. Do the following sentences sound strange as well for you?

    1 He sings in this bar on Saturday. (One time not regularly) He sings in this bar tomorrow.
    2 They leave for New York on Monday. They have bought the tickets already. (They leave for New York tomorrow)

    The following example was taken from a grammar book (sorry, but I forget the author’s name)
    3 I get up at eight o’clock next Tuesday; I have to be at my lawyer’s. (One time not regularly)
    ( which is possible to rephrase like - My getting up next Tuesday is scheduled for eight o’clock. Ivan_I's rephrasing)


    I am not trying to make you start using this "Present Simple+tomorrow" construction, of course. Just trying to solve this paradox.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I know that TT, that's why I rekindled this discussion. Do the following sentences sound strange as well for you?

    1 He sings in this bar on Saturday. (One time not regularly) He sings in this bar tomorrow.
    2 They leave for New York on Monday. They have bought the tickets already. (They leave for New York tomorrow)

    The following example was taken from a grammar book (sorry, but I forget the author’s name)
    3 I get up at eight o’clock next Tuesday; I have to be at my lawyer’s. (One time not regularly)
    ( which is possible to rephrase like - My getting up next Tuesday is scheduled for eight o’clock. Ivan_I's rephrasing)


    I am not trying to make you start using this "Present Simple+tomorrow" construction, of course. Just trying to solve this paradox.
    I'm happy with 2. but not with 1. or 3., which must have to do with a wider context than the simple grammar. Maybe I'm familiar with its use for journeys, but with not much else.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I'm happy with 2. but not with 1. or 3., which must have to do with a wider context than the simple grammar. Maybe I'm familiar with its use for journeys, but with not much else.
    Hi
    How can we know the simple present is arranged in (2(They leave for New York tomorrow)) but not habitual like the sentence in the first post?
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I know if it onlu occurs tomorrow can't be a habit. I meant this:
    for tomorrow to refer not only to the day after today, but often, alternatively, to the day of the week after today. It's Friday today, so Do you see him tomorrow? can easily mean Are you in the habit of seeing him on Saturdays?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I know if it onlu occurs tomorrow can't be a habit. I meant this:
    I'm not sure that this is as "easily" done as Thomas suggests. That's quite a lot of context to have to shove in before you say the sentence. You'll have to set up the idea that you see him weekly first.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    You can see someone regularly on a certain day, which may be Wednesday. Thomas Tompion's point (I think) was that it's possible to ask "Do you see him tomorrow?", meaning "Do you see him regularly on Wednesdays?" I'm not sure that I agree with that, and it is a very special case.

    It can't readily be applied to "going to New York tomorrow", as it would have to mean that every Wednesday (represented by "tomorrow") they leave for New York. It wouldn't be my interpretation of the question.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I'm not sure that this is as "easily" done as Thomas suggests. That's quite a lot of context to have to shove in before you say the sentence. You'll have to set up the idea that you see him weekly first.
    You can see someone regularly on a certain day, which may be Wednesday. Thomas Tompion's point (I think) was that it's possible to ask "Do you see him tomorrow?", meaning "Do you see him regularly on Wednesdays?" I'm not sure that I agree with that, and it is a very special case.

    It can't readily be applied to "going to New York tomorrow", as it would have to mean that every Wednesday (represented by "tomorrow") they leave for New York. It wouldn't be my interpretation of the question.
    Thank you both very much
    If it means just only happens tomorrow, is it a scheduled?
     
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