Do you think your film was very good? No, it wasn't (very good)...

marcogaiotto

Senior Member
Italian
Do you think your film was very good? No,_______, but it was chosen for the competition.
Hello! I'm still here asking for some piece of advice.
I have to complete the sentence. I'd put a short answer (1) or a complete answer (2), but I'm wondering if the comma before "it was chosen.." is correct.
1) Do you think your film was very good? No, it wasn't, but it was chosen for the competition. ---> I'd put a full stop here: "...wasn't. But..."
2) Do you think your film was very good? No, it wasn't very good, but it was chosen for the competition. ---> That's correct to me.

Do you agree? Thank you so much beforehand!
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Starting the sentence with No implies No, you don't think it was good.
    This seems odd to me (for example, you are answering your own question).

    I would simply say It wasn't, but ...

    You can also say is very good and It isn't.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The question itself is not exactly idiomatic!

    I would want to answer it in a way that doesn’t quite fit that rigid form. For example:

    It’s not for me to say that it was “very” good, but it was evidently good enough to be chosen for the competition.​
    But to answer your question directly, the repeat of “very good” is optional.
     

    marcogaiotto

    Senior Member
    Italian
    The question itself is not exactly idiomatic!

    I would want to answer it in a way that doesn’t quite fit that rigid form. For example:

    It’s not for me to say that it was “very” good, but it was evidently good enough to be chosen for the competition.​
    But to answer your question directly, the repeat of “very good” is optional.
    Thank you so much once again! And what about the punctuation? Is the comma (given by the exercise) correct in both cases (1 and 2)?
     

    Mrs JJJ

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (British)
    The question itself is not exactly idiomatic!
    I agree. With the word "good", I think the more idiomatic question would be:
    Do you think your film was any good?

    However, I realise that this isn't exactly what your questioner wishes to know! In conversation, stressing the word "you" would help. Otherwise, I think I'd be more likely to say:

    Do you think your film was really good?

    Similarly, in #2, if you include the word "No", you need to stress the word "very" to avoid the problem that e2efour pointed out. (ie You have a low opinion of your own film.)

    I think both the comma and the full stop work. But I'd prefer a slightly longer pause and thus a full stop.
     
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