"..., do you?" vs "..., will he?"

Morrow

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi,

I assume both are fine.

(1) I don't think Bill will arrive until 8:00, do you?
(2) I don't think Bill will arrive until 8:00, will he?

Do you agree?

Thank you in advance
Morrow
 
  • soccergal

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Both are fine. In speech the inflection will be different.
    (1) I don't think Bill will arrive until 8:00, do you?
    (2) I don't think Bill will arrive until 8:00, will he?
     
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    Morrow

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Dear soccergal,

    I appreciate your help and comments.

    Can I ask one last question for this thread?

    Speaker A: What time is Bill coming?
    Speaker B : I'm not sure, but I don't think he'll arrive until 8:00, ( )?

    Do you agree both "do you" and "will he" can occupy the blank above?

    Morrow
     

    soccergal

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Both tag questions could occupy the blank, but "do you" sounds more natural. Also, you may consider, "I don't think he will arrive before 8:00." This gives Bill a little more flexibility. He may arrive promptly at 8:00, or even a little later.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The most natural tag question repeats the main verb of the sentence or its auxiliary. In this case "I don't... ..., do you?"
    But the version repeating the verb in the whatever-its-called clause about Bill sounds OK.
    I suspect, though, that if you were asked in an exam to supply a tag question the expected answer is "do you?"

    Edit: I think this post is rubbish. See later.
     
    Last edited:

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    The way I see it....

    In sentence #1, (do you?) both the speaker and the addressee are left with assumptions.

    In sentence #2 (will he?), however, the addressee may be better informed than the speaker.
     

    Morrow

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Dear all,

    I appreciate your help and comments.

    Can I ask one final question for this thread?

    Do you think the question tag "will he" has rising intonation?

    (3) Speaker A: What time is Bill coming?
    Speaker B : I'm not sure, but I don't think he'll arrive until 8:00, will he?

    Morrow
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    Dear all,

    I appreciate your help and comments.

    Can I ask one final question for this thread?

    Do you think the question tag "will he" has rising intonation?

    (3) Speaker A: What time is Bill coming?
    Speaker B : I'm not sure, but I don't think he'll arrive until 8:00, will he?
    I'm not sure that is an appropriate example, Morrow.
    If A is asking the question in the first place, it means he doesn't know. So it sounds a bit silly of B to return the question -- especially using "will he" (see my post #6).
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Sorry, but my last post now seems very strange to me.
    Back to the topic sentences.
    (1) I don't think Bill will arrive until 8:00, do you?
    (2) I don't think Bill will arrive until 8:00, will he?

    I don't think either of these sentences has a good tag question.
    The first is a genuine question following the statement.
    The second is not a natural sentence.

    The "proper" tag question repeats and negates the main verb AND repeats the subject of the main verb either directly or using a pronoun.
    (3) I don't think Bill will arrive until 8:00, do I?

    To have a tag question querying Bill's arrival time, the main sentence has to have Bill as subject.
    Bill won't arrive before 8:00, will he?
    Bill will arrive after 8:00, won't he?
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Sorry, but my last post now seems very strange to me.
    (3) I don't think Bill will arrive until 8:00, do I?
    This one seems pretty strange to me, panj. That structure seems to be more rhetorical cockney than normal mainstream English.
     
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