Do you want a (candy/hi-protein) bar?

zaffy

Senior Member
Polish
"Do you want a bar?" - Would that work if I wanted to offer someone a candy bar like Snickers or KitKat? Does it make sense if I said just 'a bar', not specifying what kid of a bar I'm talking about? The KitKat wrapping says '7 bars'. Why not '7 candy bars'?
 

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  • RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    So you would expect to be asked "Do you want a candy bar?", right?
    In AmE, yes.
    "Do you want a bar?" - Would that work if I wanted to offer someone a candy bar like Snickers or KitKat? Does it make sense if I said just 'a bar', not specifying what kid of a bar I'm talking about? The KitKat wrapping says '7 bars'. Why not '7 candy bars'?
    It is one single candy bar that can be broken into bars, just as others can be broken into squares. The seven* bars are seven pieces of one candy bar.

    And if you do ask "Do you want a candy bar?", the answer will likely be "What kind?"if it isn't immediately obvious.


    * Numbers ten and below are normally spelled out, rather than written as numerals.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    In the UK, we would ask 'Would you like a bar of chocolate?', or, 'Would you like a KitKat/Snickers/Twix (or whatever)?'
    And if it isn't made of chocolate? Like all those protein, vitamin etc bars. I need to use the name or can I say "Would you like a hi-protein bar?"
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    No. I have a vague feeling that they only use candy to mean boiled sweets, but that may be wrong or outdated.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Yes.* (I would only use it to mean a bar of plain milk/dark chocolate, though -- no nuts or other added ingredients.) We also say "a chocolate bar".


    * But we would use double quotes, not single. :D
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Yes.* (I would only use it to mean a bar of plain milk/dark chocolate, though -- no nuts or other added ingredients.) We also say "a chocolate bar".
    I am a bit lost. Aren't you talking about a regular bar of chocolate like on the left in the pic? In Polish we have a different name for those things. I thought on the left we see 'two bars of chocolate' and on the right we see a 'candy bar'

    bar.jpg
     
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    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    So what do BE speakers see in the picture above? Are all of them called 'a chocolate bar' or' a bar of chocolate'? No different name for a Snickers? Looks like AE speakers have a different name for a Snickers (like we do in Polish), that is 'a candy bar'.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Some edible things are "pure chocolate" (chocolate with nothing else), and if they are bar-shaped, English grammar tells us we can call one "a bar of chocolate" or "a chocolate bar". That's grammar, not an assigned name. In general use, we say "a chocolate bar with peanuts" or "a chocolate bar with almonds" if nuts are added. But a bar-shaped object with several ingredients (like a Snickers bar) is not called "a chocolate bar" (in AE) just because it has chocolate in it. Snickers makes several different flavors of "candy bars" and "ice cream bars".

    Similarly a bar-shaped object that consists of health food is a "health food bar". If the ingredients include a lot of protein, it may be called "a protein bar", especially in advertisements.

    "Do you want a bar?" - Would that work if I wanted to offer someone a candy bar like Snickers or KitKat? Does it make sense if I said just 'a bar', not specifying what kid of a bar I'm talking about?
    No. You would at least say "candy bar" or "protein bar". There are hundreds of things called a "bar".

    More likely you would tell the listener (or show them) what kind of candy bar you are offering.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Me too -- or at least a visit to a pub. "After a day like that, I want a bar!" (I want a couple drinks at a pub).
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    OK, I see, but in AE a regular chocolate bar with say nuts like we see in the picture on the left, will never be called a candy bar, right? Whereas a Snickers can be called both a chocolate bar and a candy bar, right?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    No, in AE that is backwards. A regular chocolate bar with nuts is also a candy bar.

    A Snickers bar is not a chocolate bar.

    a bar-shaped object with several ingredients (like a Snickers bar) is not called "a chocolate bar" (in AE)
    A chocolate bar is a bar made of chocolate.
    A rubber ducky is a (toy) ducky made of rubber.
    A flannel nightgown is a nightgown made of flannel.
    A brick wall is a wall made of brick.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Yes.* (I would only use it to mean a bar of plain milk/dark chocolate, though -- no nuts or other added ingredients.) We also say "a chocolate bar".
    I am a bit lost. Aren't you talking about a regular bar of chocolate like on the left in the pic? In Polish we have a different name for those things. I thought on the left we see 'two bars of chocolate' and on the right we see a 'candy bar'

    View attachment 31497
    I see three candy bars. Two of them are chocolate bars with what appears to be fruit and/or nuts in them. None of them are bars of chocolate.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    And what do we break a chocolate bar into? Pieces? Squares? Cubes?

    A: Have some more chocolate.
    B: No thanks, I've already had three pieces/squares/cubes and that's enough for me.
     

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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    And what do we break a chocolate bar into? Pieces? Squares? Cubes?
    Hershey's refers to them as pips. I don't think that anyone else does.

    The "Goralki" thing is more of a cookie dipped in chocolate than a candy bar. Those things with no chocolate are sold in the grocery store with the cookies not the candies.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would still call it a bar of chocolate if I was describing. Life's too short to describe it as a sweet bar-shaped treat made of nougat topped with caramel and peanuts and enrobed in milk chocolate. :) And we don't say 'candy bar' here.

    In real life, though, amongst friends, I would simply call it a Snickers.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Do you still see three bars of chocolate (BE) or three candy bars (AE)? Or can I say there is one wafer bar (on the right)?
    In AE, a "chocolate bar" is a "bar of chocolate". It follows the same grammar rules as everything else. But in AE "a chocolate bar" is also "a candy bar". They are not different things: one term includes the other term. Chocolate is a popular candy.

    Calling any of these things a "bar" refers to its shape, not its contents. I call the thing on the right a wafer.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I still think of it as a Marathon.
    The names in the UK are often/usually not the same as in the US. In the US, what they call a Milky Way is called a Mars Bar in the UK. What is a Milky Way in the UK is ~a Three Musketeers in the US. Bounty (coated in milk or dark chocolate) UK (Made by Mars) is (almost) Mounds (coated in dark choclate (Hershey) in the US - I've not made a comprehensive decoder wheel. Wikipedia is quite happy to call Mounds a "candy bar" while calling Bounty a "chocolate bar".
    Another food-related thread where AE and BE show their differences :)
     
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