Do you want me to spin you

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ridgemao

Senior Member
Chinese - Mandarin
I want to hold my kid's hands, and spin round and round on my feet fast, so my kid will fly around me.


Can I say this sentence to my kid: Do you want me to spin you?


Maybe spin is inappropriate here, I didn't mean my kid turns(or spins) around on his feet, I want him to move around me. But I don't know which word I should use, if there was no such a word, do you have any other ways to express this meaning?

thanks.
 
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  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think that 'shall I spin you around?' is an acceptable way to reference the activity you describe.

    I don't know of a set term for this. Is there any great need for precision here?

    Children are strangely accepting of all sorts. You could say 'let's do helicopters' and they'd probably not object.
     

    newtowelding

    Senior Member
    Canada-English
    Coming from Canada, "shall i spin you around" seems very formal, but completely acceptable.

    If you are just looking to speak informally with your child, I would say "Do you want me to spin you around?"

    I agree with the previous comment, in that children will accept many different ways of saying this!
     

    sparklark

    Member
    Chinese
    You can also say
    How about I spin you around?
    Do you like a spin-around?
    << deleted - off topic and chatspeak >>
    A toddler wouldn't tell the difference:)
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    ridgemao

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Mandarin
    In addition to the context of my 1# post, I want my kid to fly around me clockwise, for him it is to the left. Can I say the below sentence? Can I use "to the left" here?


    Do you want me to spin you around to the left?


    (My 1# post: I want to hold my kid's hands, and spin round and round on my feet fast, so my kid will fly around me)


    Thank you again.
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Can I use "to the left" here?
    Technically you are asking whether 'to the left' can substitute for 'counterclockwise'. I'd say yes, it can, especially in a context such as this one. I can think of no better way of expressing what you have in mind.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I always find this sort of thing problematic. If you're spinning to your right, the child is presumably spinning towards its left (and vice versa). If viewed from above, this might be considered as clockwise; if viewed from below, anticlockwise. It's a relativistic conundrum.
     

    johnydynamic

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I would propose "swing around" as conveying exactly what you describe. "Swinging" is back-and-forth motion. "Around" as a modifier implies the motion is circular (or at least circuitous). The common element between swinging and spinning is that they both represent motion relative to a stationary point.

    Regards,
    Johny D.
     
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