" Do you work out for a long time?"

roniy

Senior Member
ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
" Do you work out for a long time?"
I have heared that and I am wondering should it be

" Have you worked out for a long time?"
???

It's as I ask "How long have you been living here?"

I can't ask
" How long do you live here?", can I ??

Thanks.
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    "Do you work out for a long time" would mean to me, "Do you spend a long time exercising each time you exercise".

    "Have you worked out for a long time" would mean to me, "Have you been exercising for many months/years".


    "How long have you been living here?" :tick:
    " How long do you live here?" :cross:
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    JamesM said:
    "Do you work out for a long time" would mean to me, "Do you spend a long time exercising each time you exercise".

    "Have you worked out for a long time" would mean to me, "Have you been exercising for many months/years".


    "How long have you been living here?" :tick:
    " How long do you live here?" :cross:
    Oh, I see the difference , yeah it makes sense.
    Thank you so much.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    I think "do you work out a lot" is a more idiomatic expression-- almost a set phrase. It's hard to explain idiom, and you've probably noticed many of us say "that's just the way we say it."

    To illustrate my point-- take another similar set phrase, "do you come here often."

    It would sound odd to say "do you come here a lot," and also odd to say "do you work out often." And yet both are correct in the textbook sense, as I'm sure any non-native speaker would be quick to say.
    .
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    foxfirebrand said:
    I think "do you work out a lot" is a more idiomatic expression-- almost a set phrase. It's hard to explain idiom, and you've probably noticed many of us say "that's just the way we say it."

    To illustrate my point-- take another similar set phrase, "do you come here often."

    It would sound odd to say "do you come here a lot," and also odd to say "do you work out often." And yet both are correct in the textbook sense, as I'm sure any non-native speaker would be quick to say.
    .
    Thank you for the response but I don't really get what you are saying.
    You say that "do you work out a lot" means the same as " Have you been working out for a long time ?" or it means as JamesM says ???
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I think what foxfirebrand is saying is that the most common question we would expect to hear is: "Do you work out a lot?" and I would agree. It's much more common than "Have you worked out for a long time?"

    The first is a more general query, and allows for the possibility that they don't work out at all. The second is more specific, and assumes that you know they have worked out.
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    JamesM said:
    I think what foxfirebrand is saying is that the most common question we would expect to hear is: "Do you work out a lot?" and I would agree. It's much more common than "Have you worked out for a long time?"

    The first is a more general query, and allows for the possibility that they don't work out at all. The second is more specific, and assumes that you know they have worked out.
    Wouldn't your answer be different in these 2 examples ?

    let's say
    a: "Do you work out a lot?"
    b: "No, I work out just twice a week? "

    a:"Have you worked out for a long time?"
    b: "yes , I have worked out for a year."

    What do you say ?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Yes. They would be different. Your answers look perfect.

    I don't think anyone's proposing that one is a substitute for the other. It was just a side comment on what a more common question regarding working out would be.
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    JamesM said:
    I don't think anyone's proposing that one is a substitute for the other.
    That's where I have a problem.
    I have heard ""Do you work out a lot?" or " do you work out for a long time?" ( I know these two are different in their meaning but one of them I sure heard.
    and it seemed like it should've been this one:
    "Have you worked out for a long time?"


    You see where is my problem ??

    Thank you.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    do you work out for a long time? is valid but not very natural-sounding. I think we would tend to say, "Do you do long workouts?" or "How long are your workouts?" if we wanted to know how long each workout was.

    "Have you worked out for a long time?" works if you want to know if they have been in the habit of working out for a long period of time, although we would probably say, "Have you been working out long?"

    I hope that helps.
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    JamesM said:
    do you work out for a long time? is valid but not very natural-sounding. I think we would tend to say, "Do you do long workouts?" or "How long are your workouts?" if we wanted to know how long each workout was.

    "Have you worked out for a long time?" works if you want to know if they have been in the habit of working out for a long period of time, although we would probably say, "Have you been working out long?"

    I hope that helps.
    Probably I didn't explain myself well.

    thank you for giving me more options to say the first sentence.

    and what I wanted to say is
    this sentence
    "Do you work out alot?" has been said insted
    "Have you been working out for a long time?"

    I mean how it seemed in the situation and the question it looked like
    "have you been working out for a long time?" should've been said.

    Let me give a situation.

    A boy in a GYM comes to another boy who looks like having been working for a long time. And the first boy asks him
    "Wow you look great, do you work out a lot ?"

    I have difficulty to exaplain myself but I hope you understand my explanation.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    So, are you just reporting that you've heard people use the wrong sentence?

    As I understood it, the original questions were:

    1) Does "Do you work out for a long time?" mean the same thing as "Have you worked out for a long time?"

    No.

    2) Should the person have said "Have you worked out for a long time?" instead of "Do you work out for a long time?"

    That really depends on what the intended message of the question was. Both are valid, but are two different questions. Without knowing what information the questioner was looking for, there's no way to say that it was wrong of him or her to say, "Do you work out for a long time?" If he wanted to know the length of each workout session, it was an appropriate question. If he wanted to know how long the person being questioned had been making a habit of exercising, it would be the wrong question.


    I'm sorry, but I must be missing the question entirely. I think I should bow out of this thread with the hope that someone else will step in who is understanding the question more clearly.

    Sorry to be missing the point so much, roniy. I must be just misinterpreting your request.
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    JamesM said:
    So, are you just reporting that you've heard people use the wrong sentence?

    As I understood it, the original questions were:

    1) Does "Do you work out for a long time?" mean the same thing as "Have you worked out for a long time?"

    No.

    2) Should the person have said "Have you worked out for a long time?" instead of "Do you work out for a long time?"

    That really depends on what the intended message of the question was. Both are valid, but are two different questions. Without knowing what information the questioner was looking for, there's no way to say that it was wrong of him or her to say, "Do you work out for a long time?" If he wanted to know the length of each workout session, it was an appropriate question. If he wanted to know how long the person being questioned had been making a habit of exercising, it would be the wrong question.


    I'm sorry, but I must be missing the question entirely. I think I should bow out of this thread with the hope that someone else will step in who is understanding the question more clearly.

    Sorry to be missing the point so much, roniy. I must be just misinterpreting your request.
    first of all I want to thank you for all the time you spend to explain me the best.
    and probably or i misunderstood the sentence or probably the questioner
    wanted to ask if I work out alot.

    I think I misunderstood or even maybe misheared :)

    anyway thank you :)
     
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