Do your homework neat

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Lun-14

Banned
Hindi
Hi

Today in class while checking the homework of my students I came across a student who didn't do his homework neat.
I wrote this on his notebook:

Do your homework neat.
Do neat.
Do your work neat.
Do the work neat.


Are all these options idiomatic/natural? If not, what should I say?


Thanks a lot
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    For me they are all incorrect, and require an adverb.

    You can say "Make your homework neat". (resultative adjective)
    (Edit: I am not suggesting this as a suitable comment to write on the homework. It illustrates how an an adjective may be used in a similar sentence but with a different verb.)
     
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    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Do neat - object missing. I agree that the adverb form 'neatly' is required.
    If it's writing - 'Write neatly!' If it's everything, you can say 'Work neatly!'
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    What’s the specific problem?
    The child dirtied the pages on which he did his homework. He drew some random lines on the pages too unintentionally. His writing was also very poor.
    So the whole homework gave a very bad impression. :(
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Do neat - object missing. I agree that the adverb form 'neatly' is required.
    If it's writing - 'Write neatly!' If it's everything, you can say 'Work neatly!'
    Thank you, HG. If I change "neat" to "neatly" in my OP options (except #2), would they sound good (natural) English to you? If not, should then I stick with your "Work neatly" that you suggested in #5?
     
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    Jimbob_Disco

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hi

    Today in class while checking the homework of my students I came across a student who didn't do his homework neat.
    I wrote this on his notebook:

    Do your homework neat.
    Do neat.
    Do your work neat.
    Do the work neat.


    Are all these options idiomatic/natural? If not, what should I say?


    Thanks a lot
    Please always use the adverb 'neatly' as you're describing a verb (to do) - you need to do it neatly - it is the verb that needs to be 'neatly done'.
    Therefore, I would say 'do your homework neatly' or 'do your work neatly' - certainly not option 2 and I think option 4 sounds a bit unnatural.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    I'd like to hear from some AE speakers too. :)
    AE and BE aren't as different as you think. "Neatly" is the word you need in any form of English. "Neat" might work as an adverb in very casual speech but you wouldn't want to speak that way to your students.
     

    Erebos12345

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi

    If the specific problem is that you can't read their writing, then write legibly works well, and it's something that I can see teachers saying very often to their students.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Of course you would.

    (Their answer will be the same, though. You need an adverb.)
    Well, actually...:)

    As I recall my teachers used none of those phrases. It was a uniformly constant, "Neatness counts", which meant "neatness counts towards your total grade on this project".

    So...

    Do your homework neat.
    Do neat.
    Do your work neat.
    Do the work neat.
    Neatness counts.:tick::tick::D
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    "Neatness counts" works for me too, MrP:).


    ______

    Though I fear this may send Lun off on a tangent....
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Did someone have a look at my context in #6? I have a little doubt whether "neatly" is a right adverb for this situation.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Did someone have a look at my context in #6?
    I'm sure everyone who answered did.
    I have a little doubt whether "neatly" is a right adverb for this situation.
    They why did you use "neat" in all your examples in your OP?:rolleyes:

    This seems a (not very) neat attempt to justify extending this thread to 25 posts. Is that your target, Lun, or is it 30?
     
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    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Did someone have a look at my context in #6? I have a little doubt whether "neatly" is a right adverb for this situation.
    Indeed, your post is correct.

    Neatly is the right adverb.

    Neat is an adjective.

    Neatness is a noun.

    Nattily
    has nothing to do with this conversation.:)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Lun, you seem to be doubting the advice you have been given by everybody (except one person who might be joking).
    You need an adverb, neatly, unless you want to sound uneducated and unfit to be teaching English.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    They why did you use "neat" in all your examples in your OP?
    Because firstly (before opening this thread) I thought "neatly" (as an adverb) doesn't at all exist in English; I have been saying/writing "neat" (as an adverb) till today. :oops:

    This seems a (not very) neat attempt to justify extending this thread to 25 posts.
    :D Please don't worry - I don't have such intention.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Thank you very much all respected people who have replied to my thread.
    I've got the answer to my question. :)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    That's good to hear!
    You'll be pleased to know that one of the attributes of successful adult language learners is the willingness to acknowledge mistakes and correct them.:)
    I respect you for that.


    You might like to start another thread about the difference between 'tidy' and 'neat', and have a look at the word 'messy'.
    You said
    The child dirtied the pages on which he did his homework. He drew some random lines on the pages too unintentionally. His writing was also very poor.
     
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