Doch, das ergibt schon Sinn!

< Previous | Next >

Philipp_Austria

Senior Member
German - Austria
Hallo,

Kann mir bitte jemand sagen, ob man das deutsche "doch" auch mit "sure" übersetzen kann? Und zwar in folgendem Kontext:

A: Das ergibt keinen Sinn.
B: Doch, das ergibt schon Sinn!

Wäre folgendes möglich:
A: That doesn't make any sense.
B: Sure, it does make sense!

Oder wie integriert man das "doch"?
 
  • Minnesota Guy

    Senior Member
    American English - USA
    Hallo,

    Kann mir bitte jemand sagen, ob man das deutsche "doch" auch mit "sure" übersetzen kann? Und zwar in folgendem Kontext:

    A: Das ergibt keinen Sinn.
    B: Doch, das ergibt schon Sinn!

    Wäre folgendes möglich:
    A: That doesn't make any sense.
    B: Sure, it does make sense!
    The answer in #2 is very idiomatic. If you wanted to use "sure," I would use either of these, both in a conversational register.

    B: Sure it does!
    B: Sure it makes sense!

    If both cases, "sure" is stressed, and there's no break after "sure."

    Unfortunately, English doesn't have one clear equivalent of this "doch." :(
     

    Philipp_Austria

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    Danke allen Antworten!

    Unfortunately, English doesn't have one clear equivalent of this "doch." :(
    Ja, dieses "doch" ist wirklich sehr problematisch.


    Würdest du ein "Doch, schon!" ebenso mit "Sure!" übersetzen?

    Z.B.:
    A: Ich glaube, er kann das nicht.
    B: Doch, schon!

    Gibt es irgendeine Möglichkeit (B) zu übersetzen, ohne auch nur einen Teil des Inhahlts von (A) zu invovieren,
    d.h. ohne das "he can" wie in "Sure he can!" or "Yes he can!"

    Wäre z.B. folgendes möglich:
    A: I think he can't do this
    B: Sure!
     

    Minnesota Guy

    Senior Member
    American English - USA
    A: Ich glaube, er kann das nicht.
    B: Doch, schon!

    Gibt es irgendeine Möglichkeit (B) zu übersetzen, ohne auch nur einen Teil des Inhahlts von (A) zu invovieren,
    d.h. ohne das "he can" wie in "Sure he can!" or "Yes he can!"

    Wäre z.B. folgendes möglich:
    A: I think he can't do this
    B: Sure!
    No . . . this is precisely the problem, that English lacks a clear one-word answer for this situation, unlike German or French. "Yes" and "sure," by themselves, don't suggest the contradiction of "doch."

    There are some earlier threads that have suggested "On the contrary." That's rather formal language, but maybe worth knowing about?
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)

    sois_sage

    New Member
    English - United States
    Wäre
    A: I think he can't do this
    B: I don't think so.
    auch eher formell?
    Translating B to "I don't think so" doesn't work. If you want to avoid including "he can" in B, you could say "I think so" with heavy emphasis on the "I". That isn't formal language.

    Also, I would translate A differently: Ich glaube, er kann das nicht >> I don't think he can do it.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    A: I think he can't do this
    B: Sure!
    This would actually mean the opposite! ("Sure, I agree with you!")
    Gibt es irgendeine Möglichkeit (B) zu übersetzen, ohne auch nur einen Teil des Inhahlts von (A) zu invovieren,
    d.h. ohne das "he can" wie in "Sure he can!" or "Yes he can!"
    "On the contrary." That's rather formal language
    On the opposite end of the spectrum, there's the distinctly juvenile "Yuh-huh!" -- pretty much only used by children.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top