doctoral recipients

< Previous | Next >

apblopes

Senior Member
Portuguese, Brazil
Hi,
in this phrase: "For the past twenty-five years I have been working with doctoral students, guiding their evolution to doctoral recipients."
What's a "doctoral recipient"?
Thanks
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Sounds weird to me too, APB. It seems like a very condensed (or 'lazy', if you prefer) way of saying guiding them on their academic journeys up till the moment they receive their doctorates or something similar.
     

    apblopes

    Senior Member
    Portuguese, Brazil
    Well, it's from a book (Writing your doctoral dissertation) which seems to use quite good English, at least to me... Maybe she was trying to be informal, since the text seems more like a conversation with a doctoral student.
    Let's see if anybody else have (has?) heard of it...
     

    Spagbol

    Member
    England, English (UK)
    To me it seems to be saying that she is guiding students undertaking a doctorate towards achieving one i.e. becoming a recipient of a doctorate. Personally I don't like the word "evolution" but it can mean "a gradual development" and I suppose this does make sense.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    "...their evolution to doctoral recipients" sounds very odd to me. A "doctoral recipient" is a doctor, and as for "evolution", it sounds as if graduate school is some sort of primeval ooze out of which lungfish flop, each on its way to becoming a human being with a Ph.D.

    Once again we have someone inflating language by expressing what is really a simple idea in two words instead of in one.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I would say: "I have advised doctoral candidates for the past 25 years."

    On the other hand, academia seems to reward inflated, convoluted and just plain execreble expression of the English language and one deviates from the wretched norm at one's own risk.
     

    Rana_pipiens

    Senior Member
    USA / English
    A "doctoral recipient" is a doctor ...
    While technically correct, that is misleading. A person who has a doctoral degree other than medical is almost never described as a doctor.

    In a professional setting, a person who has a DVM or DDS is typically addressed with the title of doctor, but usually only their office staff refers to them as a doctor ("The doctor will be in to examine Fluffy in a minute") -- they are a veterinarian or a dentist.

    A person with a PhD may, or may not, be addressed as "Dr. Smith" professionally, but rarely socially, and they are referred to either by their profession (engineer, professor, etc.), or as a PhD, if their educational level is under discussion ("The company is interested in hiring several PhDs.").

    Lawyer aren't even addressed, let alone referred to, as "doctor," but a juris doctorate too is a doctoral degree.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    While technically correct, that is misleading. A person who has a doctoral degree other than medical is almost never described as a doctor.
    Almost never?

    How about Dr. Laura on radio or Dr. Phil on television or formerly, Dr. Joyce Brothers, etc? Extremely popular personalities all and none is an M.D.
     

    Rana_pipiens

    Senior Member
    USA / English
    I think a statement of almost never can survive three counterexamples. The operant phrase is "extremely popular personalities": in media and show biz, names don't necessarily have any basis in reality -- like all of the advice columns called "Ask Aunt Bea" or some similar name meant to evoke a commensensical elderly lady, but actually written by a twenty-five-year-old named Steve.

    Dr. Phil, Dr. Laura, et al., are (a) PhDs and entitled to be addressed professionally as "Dr. (Whoever)", and (b) therapists and thus a type of health professional, like vets or dentists. So they're not even fudging all that much in seeking the cachet and authority derived from being called a doctor.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    While technically correct, that is misleading. A person who has a doctoral degree other than medical is almost never described as a doctor.
    Except in academia, where it is extremely common, and that is the situation being described here. Certainly, it would not be remotely strange to address a university lecturer in history as "Doctor Jones", or to refer to a college president as "Doctor Smith", and I doubt very much that anyone would think this implied that the person in question was a physician.

    One might also note that historically, the title "doctor" was originally intended for teachers, especially theologians, and that its use at all for physicians came centuries later.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I understood Rana_pipiens to be saying that all holders of PhDs can be addresed as "Dr", but that "a doctor" (with no "of X") normally implies "doctor of medicine".

    I'd agree with that.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top