doe je jasje aan

serbianfan

Senior Member
British English
At what age of the child does the average Dutch parent stop saying 'Doe je jasje aan' and start saying 'Doe je jas aan'? Are there any parents who would normally say 'Doe je jas aan' to a young child of five, or maybe only if they were angry with the child?
 
  • Pedro Paraíso

    Member
    Flamish
    'Doe je jasje aan' hangt niet alleen af van de leeftijd van een kind, maar ook van de omstandigheden (grootouders zullen dat wellicht eerder zeggen, of het kan bij een volwassene liefkozend zijn bedoeld). Er zijn ook veel ouders die tegen hun kinderen niet in verkleinwoorden spreken. De gestelde vraag valt jammer genoeg niet zonder meer te beantwoorden.
     

    serbianfan

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thanks for your reply. When I lived in Groningen, it seemed that all the parents I knew regularly used diminutives. So I wonder who the "veel ouders" are who don't use them? Do they tend to be more middle-class people? Or do they live in particular parts of the Netherlands?
     

    Peterdg

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    I'm a parent (and a grandparent) and I would never use the diminutive in that case, whatever the age. Some people would, others won't. Just like that.
     

    serbianfan

    Senior Member
    British English
    OK, thanks. So if it's "just like that", then presumably the ones who don't use diminutives don't think it's "wrong" in any sense to use them? Because in the UK, you'll find many parents who think you shouldn't say "doggie" (instead of "dog") to children, i.e. don't speak "baby language" but "grown-up language" to children.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Flanders has a diminutive culture (along with harshness in other contexts), I would say. Especially in food contexts we have groentjes, tafeltjes, frietjes, etc., but not stoeltjes, and certainly not rekeningetjes. Jasjes, kleedjes, sokjes, are indeed commonly used with children, but sometimes even in clothes shops, etc. They are supposed to sound more affectionate, I think, like in language with children, but it is growing rampant, or so I think. I do not like it. They do not turn up in "expensive" contexts, I think, but I am not quite sure...
     
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