Does apple have something to do with aristocratic taste?

Miaomiao Gong

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello everyone!
I am reading a novel called " the sea, the sea". The hero is a retired theatre director who is very fond of delicious food. He said, "If any one wonders at the absence of ‘eating’ apples from my diet let me explain that this is one case where I have spoilt my palate with an aristocratic taste. I can eat only Cox’s Orange Pippins, and am in mourning applewise from April to October."
I don't understand this sentence. Does the hero mean he likes eating apples so much that he eats apples almost every time when he diets? And once he didn't eat apples when dieting because he wanted to have aristocratic taste, but he "spoilt his palate".
Do I understand it correctly?
Thank you for your help!
 
  • Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    Diet is used here in the sense of 'the things one eats', not dieting in the sense of restricting what you eat in order to lose weight.

    He is saying that the only type of apple he likes are Cox's Orange Pippins, which are only available from November to March. From April to October, since Cox's Orange Pippins are not available, he doesn't eat any apples.

    He is saying his palate has been spoilt because once he has tasted the Cox's Orange Pippins, all other apples taste bad (or inferior to him).

    I am not sure whether he refers to this as an 'aristocratic taste' because Cox's Orange Pippins are particularly good or expensive, or perhaps because only the likes of aristocrats have the luxury of picking and choosing what they eat rather than eating anything which is available. Perhaps someone with a more intimate knowledge of Cox's Orange Pippins can help.
     
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    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    "Cox’s Orange Pippins" seem to be available only from November through March. Thus, they are relatively rare and these rare apples are the only variety that his "aristocratic" taste will allow him to eat.
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hi, Miao.

    The expression "the absence of ‘eating’ apples" is strange: it means "the absence of apples for eating". Maybe there are apples that are not meant to be eaten?
    I believe the sentence would be perfect like this: "If any one wonders at the absence of Ø apples from my diet...".

    Sorry I can't tell you more.

    GS
     

    Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    Hi, Miao.

    The expression "the absence of ‘eating’ apples" is strange: it means "the absence of apples for eating". Maybe there are apples that are not meant to be eaten?
    I believe the sentence would be perfect like this: "If any one wonders at the absence of Ø apples from my diet...".

    Sorry I can't tell you more.

    GS
    I assume a contrast is implied between 'eating' apples and 'cooking' apples. (As cyberpedant said...)
     
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