Does Croatian contain more Slavic words than Serbian/Bosnian?

Nikined

Senior Member
Russian
Is it true that Croatian is "more Slavic" than Serbian lexically, with more Slavic words instead of Western borrowings? And what about Bosnian, I haven't known of it as much?
 
  • Lazar_Bgd

    Member
    Serbian - Serbia
    Is it true that Croatian is "more Slavic" than Serbian lexically, with more Slavic words instead of Western borrowings? And what about Bosnian, I haven't known of it as much?
    Indeed, Serbian tends to use more of foreign words than Croatian. E.g. "football" is "fudbal" in Serbian and "nogomet" in Croatian. As for Bosnian, I think it depends on the region (i.e. ethnicity) but I stand to be corrected.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Indeed, Serbian tends to use more of foreign words than Croatian. E.g. "football" is "fudbal" in Serbian and "nogomet" in Croatian.
    The Croatian standard is known for having been artificially purified (much like, say, Czech); Serbian has simply avoided that and effectively contains more foreign loans and less calques or newly invented words.
     

    Anemona61

    Senior Member
    Serbian, Serbia
    One example comes to my mind immediately: names for the months. In Croatian they have Slavic origin and in Serbian they are Latin-derived.
     

    cHr0mChIk

    Member
    Serbian (maternal); Slovak (paternal)
    And do you know about Bosnian, is it "between" the two languages?
    Bosnian would be closer to Serbian
    (In this aspect but I'd say in many others as well)

    Because both Croatian and Bosnian use "ije" as a reflection of the old Slavic "yat" vowel, it gives an impression that they are close to one another, Serbian being the different, odd one.

    However, in reality, Croatian has a lot of vocabulary which is unique to it, while Serbian and Bosnian share words for the same term.

    This has to do with the process of the artificial purification which was mentioned before.
     

    polskajason

    Member
    English - American
    It's not always the result of purification, which created neologisms that aren't popularly used (like zrakoplov and brzoglas). The language/variant exists on a continuum between Slovenian and Serbian, and more often than not, when a term differs between Serbian and Croatian, the Croatian term is the same as or similar to the Slovenian term (kruh, zrak, vlak, etc.)
     
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