Does it sound right to/for you?

  • NealMc

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hi

    Does that sound right to you? A question about the veracity / validity / quality (of information).

    Does that sound right for you? A question about the tone / quality of a sound source based on personal comfort eg setting headphone levels.

    Does that sound alright to you? A question about your opinion on a subject in general.

    Does that sound alright for you? A question about your opinion on a subject which directly affects you (but does sound a little unnatural).

    Cheers
    Neal Mc
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    I don't think we can answer that, QD, because you haven't given us the context. What situation did you have in mind?
    Thank you for your concern, sound shift.
    The base sentence is what I use often after I post a sentence. For instance, does the following sound right and natural to/for you?

    Could you spare me a few words as for the reason why "Nothing is as much important as our health?"
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, sound shift.
    But could you explain why it is "to" here instead of "for?" By the way, the following is a similar sentence pattern, but it takes "for" instead of "to." And this inconsistence causes lots of troubles for us.

    For some people, human cloning is not a scientific issue but a moral problem.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    QD,

    At the moment, I can think of only one type of situation where "Does it sound right for you?" would be approriate. Suppose you said you were looking for a new car and suppose I found an ad that looked interesting in the local newspaper. If I read the ad aloud to you, I might conclude with "Does it sound right for you?" That means "Is there a chance that you would buy this car?"

    The situation with your "base sentence" is different. The question there is not about your needs and preferences but about the correctness of the base sentence.

    Different situation: different preposition.


    Individual English prepositions have so many different meanings and nuances of meaning that it is impossible for schools in English-speaking countries to teach rules as to when each preposition should be used, so I am afraid I cannot name a rule for my rejection of "Does it sound right for you?" in the context you supplied.

    I'm not sure that "inconsistency" (in the use of prepositions) is the right word. There are millions of meanings to be expressed, so I think it is more a question of complexity and nuance.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Thanks, sound shift.
    But could you explain why it is "to" here instead of "for?" By the way, the following is a similar sentence pattern, but it takes "for" instead of "to." And this inconsistence causes lots of troubles for us.

    For some people, human cloning is not a scientific issue but a moral problem.

    I don't think this is a good parallel, QD.

    Try something like this. Let's say you are female:

    Women get only half the pay of men. Does that sound fair to you?
    Women get only half the pay of men. Does that sound fair for you?

    The first asks for an opinion on the proposition that women should get only half the pay of men. It is a call for a value judgment from an objective point of view.

    The second asks if you will personally accept half the pay of a man. It is a call for an evaluation of it as it directly relates to your personal circumstances.
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    QD,

    Different situation: different preposition.

    I'm not sure that "inconsistency" (in the use of prepositions) is the right word. There are millions of meanings to be expressed, so I think it is more a question of complexity and nuance.
    Thanks, sound shift, for your time and consideration. I agree with what you cleared up.
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    I don't think this is a good parallel, QD.

    Try something like this. Let's say you are female:

    Women get only half the pay of men. Does that sound fair to you?
    Women get only half the pay of men. Does that sound fair for you?

    The first asks for an opinion on the proposition that women should get only half the pay of men. It is a call for a value judgment from an objective point of view.

    The second asks if you will personally accept half the pay of a man. It is a call for an evaluation of it as it directly relates to your personal circumstances.
    Thanks, James, for the expressive and persuasive reply.
    Now I get it.
     

    estefanos

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Does it sound right and natural to/for you?

    They are both correct, but they don't mean the same thing.

    "Does it sound right and natural to you" means "do you think it sounds right and natural."

    "Does it sound right and natural for you" means "does it sounds like it will (smoothly) meet your needs." I've used (smoothly) here to try to convey the meaning of 'natural' when combined with 'for'. The normal phrase is simply 'right for you'.

    A car that "sounds right for you" is a car that fulfills your requirements.

    Hope this helps a bit. They aren't equivalent constructions.
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    They are both correct, but they don't mean the same thing.

    "Does it sound right and natural to you" means "do you think it sounds right and natural."

    "Does it sound right and natural for you" means "does it sounds like it will (smoothly) meet your needs." I've used (smoothly) here to try to convey the meaning of 'natural' when combined with 'for'. The normal phrase is simply 'right for you'.

    A car that "sounds right for you" is a car that fulfills your requirements.

    Hope this helps a bit. They aren't equivalent constructions.
    Thank you, estetanos, for your interest in this thread and your distinctive explanation.
     
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